Hlaudi Motsoeneng is building on the momentum of his 90% local content drive as he sets his new political party, African Content Movement in motion. Picture: Nhlanhla Phillips/African News Agency/ANA

Johannesburg - Hlaudi Motsoeneng is building on the momentum of his 90% local content drive as he sets his new political party, African Content Movement (ACM), in motion.
“I was encouraged by the bold decisions I took at the SABC to change the lives of ordinary people

“I still want to pursue what I pursued at the SABC, but now I am going to pursue all these (other) issues. I am not gonna leave the SABC outside the 90% because they are part of state-owned enterprises,” said Motsoeneng.

He accused the ANC of colluding with other parties to oust him from the public broadcaster. “In my view, they (ANC) were supposed to support me because they know I want to change the lives of ordinary people.”

Meanwhile, ANC acting national spokesperson Zizi Kodwa said the party had more serious issues to focus on than Motsoeneng.

“I think Hlaudi takes himself seriously, and I don’t know anyone who takes him seriously. We don’t have time to plot to remove Hlaudi. The mess he made at the SABC is Hlaudism.

“We are dealing with his mess. The only serious people who left the ANC are Cope, and they are prominent. The rest are Mickey Mouse," said Kodwa.

Motsoeneng said the ACM was launched due to popular demand.

“I didn’t just launch a party. When I’d go around the streets, individuals would approach me and ask why I was not forming my own political party because they know what I stand for. They’re aware that I am trying to implement change in their lives.”

Motsoeneng lamented that the ANC government had failed to take charge of the economy 25 years after the dawn of democracy.

“The economy is not in our hands, because government is confused on how to deal with so-called empowerment. Our empowerment is not black or white because the ACM is a non-racial movement. But what we are clear on is that the majority must benefit without any fear and favour.

One of the party’s radical decisions would be regulating how foreign investors did business in South Africa.

“We are saying our minerals must be owned by South Africans. But we can partner with (foreign investors) so they transfer skills to our people.”

The Sunday Independent