Anto Mpianzi, centre, the mother of Enock Mpianzi, with family members during the memorial service of the Grade 8 pupil who drowned in January at Nyati Bush and River Break lodge outside Brits in North West.      Itumeleng English African News Agency (ANA).
Anto Mpianzi, centre, the mother of Enock Mpianzi, with family members during the memorial service of the Grade 8 pupil who drowned in January at Nyati Bush and River Break lodge outside Brits in North West.  Itumeleng English African News Agency (ANA).

Enock Mpianzi's family sues Gauteng Education for R10m

By Botho Molosankwe Time of article published Jun 8, 2020

Share this article:

Johannesburg - The family of Enock Mpianzi, 13, a Grade 8 pupil from Parktown Boys High who drowned while on a school outing at the beginning of the year, is suing the Gauteng Department of Education for R10 million.

Gauteng Education MEC Panyaza Lesufi revealed on while checking schools for their readiness amid the Covid-19 pandemic and schools reopening earlier on Monday.

He said they had received a letter from Enock's family demanding R10m from the department.

"We have indicated that we have no appetite to oppose this matter," he said.

Enock drowned on January 15 during a water activity organised by the school at the Nyati Bush and Riverbreak in Brits.

It was found the boys were not given life jackets when they entered the fast-flowing water and, despite other boys reporting Enock missing, a search was delayed and his body was recovered two days later.

A report into investigations conducted into his drowning revealed, among others, that Malcolm Williams, the principal, had neglected to take the necessary steps to ascertain exactly who was at the camp and arising therefrom, if any learner was missing after the water activity that claimed Enock's life.

Williams had been placed on precautionary suspension since February, but the department announced last week, that he would be returning to his post as school principal. 

Nyati Bush and Riverbreak were also blasted for involving the learners in potentially hazardous exercises without knowing who was taking part.

The report also said the seven teachers who had been designated to look after the pupils were not enough.

The teachers were also found wanting in terms of their handling of the water activity, having stated that everything looked under control despite the fact the current was so strong pupils were panicking in the water.

IOL

Share this article:

Related Articles