Health workers at a Free State Hospital formed a guard of honour for Welkom’s Dr Mohammed Bobat after he succumbed in a Covid-19 related death on Monday. Picture: Screengrab
Health workers at a Free State Hospital formed a guard of honour for Welkom’s Dr Mohammed Bobat after he succumbed in a Covid-19 related death on Monday. Picture: Screengrab

Welkom’s selfless Dr Mohammed Bobat receives guard of honour after Covid-19 death

By Sihle Mlambo Time of article published Aug 18, 2020

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Johannesburg - Health workers at a Free State Hospital formed a guard of honour for Welkom’s Dr Mohammed Bobat after he succumbed in a Covid-19 related death on Monday.

Dressed in their protective gears, health workers formed a guard of honour as his body was taken away after he lost his battle to the virus which has now killed nearly 12 000 people in the country, including many health workers.

This comes as South Africa went into level 2 of the lockdown on Tuesday.

In a tribute to Bobat, the Covid-19 Support Group South Africa Twitter account said the fallen doctor was a brave and selfless soul.

Bobat had served the Welkom community for over 20 years.

He ran a practice before he worked for private and public hospitals in the area.

Mondli Mvambi, the spokesperson for the Free State Department of Health, confirmed the doctor had died in a Covid-19 related death.

“Our colleagues are still shocked by the loss of a man who was a leader in his field of work and who was a revered man in the community,” he said.

Mvimba said Bobat’s death, as well as the deaths of other health workers, showed why health workers in the public and private had to be saluted for putting their lives at risk to help people fight the virus.

And while speaking to Radio Islam on Monday, Welkom GP Dr Yacoob Vahed, said there was a sense of numbness, grief and sorrow in the community after Bobat’s death.

The two had first met 25 years ago, when they started their practices in the Free State town and would see each other daily at the local mosque and during community initiatives.

“We met when there were issues in the community, Dr Bobat was always present, that is the sacrifice he made for the community.

“He did not make any demands on the community for himself or his family, but he gave a lot to the community,” said Vahed.

He said Bobat was so private that he did not want to trouble people and it was only when a colleague went to visit him that he recommended he be taken to hospital.

He went to hospital the next day and, before long, had to be admitted to ICU, before he succumbed to the virus.

“Dr Bobat gave his life to the community, he got sick as a result of his work… People like him who are on the frontlines, like all other GPs and health workers, we should actually salute them.

“Many people don't know the anxiety that is happening in the background, the anxiety of you as a health worker bringing home the virus.

“People are giving their lives, this pandemic is a reality and we should all try our best to stay safe.

“Maybe this is an opportune time to remind people that the lockdown levels have dropped, but the virus and the pandemic is still there.

“We should do whatever is in our means to take all the precautions and the necessary care to stay safe,” said Vahed.

Bobat was survived by his wife, son and two daughters

IOL

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