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Patient refuses to be amputated

13/04/2016. Christinah Mdunana talks about how doctors at Steve Biko Hospital operated on her and sent home with no treatment or drugs for the open wound on her leg. Picture: Oupa Mokoena

13/04/2016. Christinah Mdunana talks about how doctors at Steve Biko Hospital operated on her and sent home with no treatment or drugs for the open wound on her leg. Picture: Oupa Mokoena

Published Apr 20, 2016

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Pretoria - Further treatment was still necessary for a woman who refused to have her leg amputated, Gauteng Department of Health spokesperson, Steve Mabona said.

Christinah Mdunana, 42, of Danville, was taken back to the hospital last Friday for further treatment after she refused to have her leg amputated. Upon arrival at the hospital for the second time, Mdunana was again told her leg had to be amputated. Again, she refused.

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Mabona said the patient was counselled on why amputation was necessary and that it would alleviate future complications which might be detrimental to her well-being.

Mabona said they could not force a patient to follow their advice.

“Clinicians are well-trained in their profession. As such, patients should accede to clinical advice,” he advised. The last thing they wanted was the deterioration of a patient’s condition as a result of refusing treatment, he added.

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But Mdunana was adamant that she would not have her leg amputated, and was given medication to manage her pain and treat the wound. She was also given a letter explaining her condition to the clinic for her wound treatment.

Mdunana was referred to Steve Biko Hospital after she was examined by a private medical practitioner.

She was admitted on March 11 and diagnosed with deep vein thrombosis and peripheral vascular disease in her left leg, She had a surgical procedure on April 1. Her leg was cut open but she was discharged with a gaping wound after she apparently refused to co-operate.

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Mabona said such patients were always encouraged to come back in the event of any complications.

Dr Mzukisi Grootboom, of the SA Medical Association, said: “The leg is vulnerable to infections which can damage the patient’s body and organs. The foot is threatened. She can’t be forced into treatment, but she is putting her life in danger.”

Pretoria News

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