PICS: Port of Durban unveils new tug jetty which will mean quicker turnaround time for larger vessels

Photo of a concrete jetty showing two tugboats on the water.

The R127 million construction project began in May 2021 and was implemented in two stages. Picture: TNPA/Supplied

Published Jun 7, 2023

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The new tug jetty at the Port of Durban will position the port as an international container hub.

The Transnet Ports Authority unveiled the new jetty on Tuesday.

The R127 million construction project began in May 2021 and was implemented in two stages.

The first stage included the establishment of a new 110-metre tug jetty next to and parallel to the existing jetty. In the second stage the original tug jetty was extended by 35 metres.

The existing tug basin was deepened to 8 meters to safely accommodate all tug vessels.

In line with the KwaZulu-Natal Master Plan, the completion of the project means that draft limitations and berthing space constraints have been eliminated.

The jetty will be able to consolidate the berthing of the port's marine fleet, which will see enable quicker turnaround time for larger vessels that require additional tugs.

The team of engineers who worked on the project. Picture: TNPA/Supplied

Port manager Mpumi Dweba-Kwetana said the completion of the tug jetty project was a great milestone for the Port of Durban.

The R127 million construction project began in May 2021 and was implemented in two stages. Picture: TNPA/Supplied

“The port now has a complement of 18 marine fleet which includes tugs, launches, pilot boats, a floating crane and a work boat. The older jetty could only accommodate 13 marine vessels, and the balance of the fleet was required to be berthed in other areas within the port. The new jetty makes the marine craft easily available to operations,” Dweba-Kwetana said.

She said the provision of efficient marine services was one of TNPA’s core service offerings to the shipping industry.

“These services include providing towage, docking, and/or undocking services to vessels calling at and leaving the port. The efficiency of this service is dependent on having a reliable marine fleet of tugs, with infrastructure that is fit for the purpose and capable of delivering an agreed-upon service level to a wide range of vessels,” Dweba-Kwetana said.

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