Trevor Noah at M-Net's press conference on Thursday.
Cape Town - Trevor Noah has been dishing out the funny from New York almost every night since September 2015.

Few would disagree that Noah, 33, has grown into his role as host of The Daily Show on Comedy Central, and that he has given it his own proudly South African touch.

He is back in the country on holiday, and has come bearing great news.

Brace yourselves for two new Trevor Noah specials on the local comedy scene - Noah will produce a 13-part comedy series and a stand-up special.

He revealed his plans at a press conference on Thursday at Montecasino in Fourways, Johannesburg.

Set to perform three shows from Saturday night until Monday at the Ticketpro Dome in Johannesburg, his new stand-up special, There’s a Gupta on My Stoep, will capture the state of affairs in South Africa.

The show’s name is a play on Gray Hofmeyr and Leon Schuster’s 1993 film, There’s a Zulu on my Stoep.

Critics have questioned the cost of tickets, which range from R450 to R1400.

“For a long time, we’ve had that South African attitude that tickets are expensive,” Noah said.

“Yet, internationally, I don’t see anybody complaining about the price of their tickets when they’re R4 000 or R5 000.”

He said he has tried to accommodate those who cannot afford front-row tickets as well as those who can.

South Africans have to start making local performers feel appreciated, Noah added.

“In South Africa, we must get better at paying each other what we deserve, and I’m talking all levels, not just in entertainment,” he said.

“Everyone, from a domestic worker to a petrol attendant, to all the people who we take for granted.”

Noah only realised once he performed overseas that “we (South Africans) underpay and we over-enjoy”.

“One thing I’ve never taken for granted is the cost of doing business, and one thing that was tough is that I wanted to do a show, and I wanted to come back to South Africa and perform for as many of my fans as possible,” he said.

“In the time that I have allocated, with the venues that I could find, the (Ticketpro) Dome was probably the only place that I could do that.”

Noah added that in South Africa, there was a shortage of large venues for entertainment shows, which was a problem.

“It’s something that anyone in entertainment knows.”

Noah said his major focus while performing back at home will be on local participation as part of his production.

He has hired local crew members and production companies, as well as included local acts and artists to be part of the fun.

Weekend Argus