The City has allocated approximately R2.1 billion for formal housing and R4bn for informal settlements and backyard dwellers. Picture: Cindy Waxa/African News Agency (ANA) Archives
The City has allocated approximately R2.1 billion for formal housing and R4bn for informal settlements and backyard dwellers. Picture: Cindy Waxa/African News Agency (ANA) Archives

City allocates R2.1bn to deal with Cape housing demand

By Marvin Charles Time of article published Jan 20, 2020

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Cape Town - The City has allocated approximately R2.1 billion for formal housing and R4bn for informal settlements and backyard dwellers.

It said it is gearing up to implement its human settlements strategy for the year ahead. It comes as the demand of housing has increased.

Mayco member for human settlements Malusi Booi said: “Greater public and private partnerships, as well as ways to unlock a more diversified and innovative affordable accommodation offering are core pillars of the strategy.

“For the past five years and more, the City has been working in this direction, but a more intensive intervention is required to drive larger-scale delivery of more affordable accommodation options in Cape Town.”

Booi said the City's revised human settlements strategy is nearing completion. It is expected to go for public participation before June this year.

Booi admitted that the City can no longer rely on the Breaking New Ground approach.

Booi said the City has allocated approximately R2.1bn over the medium term to formal housing opportunities on suitable well-located land, close to public transport, jobs, government services and public amenities and more than R4bn has been allocated to formalising informal accommodation, such as informal settlements and backyard dwellings.

The City came under fire last week after it emerged that the City intends to lease the Rondebosch Golf Club for a mere R1000 a year for the next decade. It's the same golf club where Reclaim the City activists staged a protest last year, claiming that the facility should rather be used for the provision of affordable housing.

Social housing group Ndifuna Ukwazi said the land could be used to build 2500 new homes.

Reclaim the City Woodstock chapter leader Deena Bosch said: “What we expect this year is definitely the social housing promises for Salt River and Woodstock to start. Well located City-owned land must be put to better use than just renewing golf course leases at ridiculously low rates.”

@MarvinCharles17

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