The fossil fuel-hunting seismic survey ship, Amazon Warrior, returns to the Port of Cape Town after the South African high court blocked Shell from conducting further offshore seismic testing around South Africa's pristine Wild Coast. Picture: Armand Hough African News Agency (ANA)
The fossil fuel-hunting seismic survey ship, Amazon Warrior, returns to the Port of Cape Town after the South African high court blocked Shell from conducting further offshore seismic testing around South Africa's pristine Wild Coast. Picture: Armand Hough African News Agency (ANA)

LOOK: Shell’s seismic survey ship returns to Cape Town port after court ruling

By Crispin Adriaanse Time of article published Jan 3, 2022

Share this article:

CAPE TOWN - The Amazon Warrior, the vessel sent to South Africa to conduct Shell’s seismic survey in the hunt for fossil fuels along the coast, has returned to Port of Cape Town on Monday.

The fossil fuel-hunting seismic survey ship, Amazon Warrior, returns to the Port of Cape Town after the South African high court blocked Shell from conducting further offshore seismic testing around South Africa's pristine Wild Coast. Picture: Armand Hough African News Agency (ANA)

The fossil-fuel hunting vessel was caught in frame of the iconic Green Point Lighthouse as it made its way to Cape Town’s port.

The fossil fuel-hunting seismic survey ship, Amazon Warrior, returns to the Port of Cape Town after the South African high court blocked Shell from conducting further offshore seismic testing around South Africa's pristine Wild Coast. Picture: Armand Hough African News Agency (ANA)
The fossil fuel-hunting seismic survey ship, Amazon Warrior, returns to the Port of Cape Town after the South African high court blocked Shell from conducting further offshore seismic testing around South Africa's pristine Wild Coast. Picture: Armand Hough African News Agency (ANA)

Shell’s government-sanctioned plan to conduct a 3D seismic survey on South Africa’s Wild Coast in order to identify potential hydrocarbon reserves below the seabed came to a halt six days ago on December 28.

The ruling by Judge Gerald Bloem at the Grahamstown High Court in Makhanda against Shell and the government’s plans were lauded as the ”power of the people” by environmentalists.

Director of Oceans not Oil Janet Solomon - a coalition of those who stand against South Africa’s fossil fuel dependence - said “this ruling is the very definition of law and justice being the cornerstone of our society. And it will be a very vocal warning to companies that people have the power”.

Non-profit Sustaining the Wild Coast (SWC) Sinegugu Zukulu said: “The voices of the voiceless have been heard. The voices of the directly affected people have at last been heard, and the constitutional rights of indigenous people have been upheld.”

Shell responded to the ruling by stating: “Shell respects the court decision in relation to the Wild Coast survey and has suspended the survey while we review the judgement.”

There have been a number of protests documented from the beginning of December after news broke of Shell and South Africa’s plan, and the impact seismic survey has on the environment.

Greenpeace Africa’s petition titled “Stop Shell from destroying the Wild Coast” garnered more than 84 600 signatures.

IOL

Share this article: