Six months after the World Cup, the South African soccer lovers favourite toy, the vuvuzela, has proved its popularity by making it on to The New York Times words of the year list.

The French loathed it. The Mexicans loved it. And some fans even sneaked one back home.

Now, six months after the World Cup, the South African soccer lovers’ favourite toy, the vuvuzela, has proved its popularity by making it on to The New York Times’ words of the year list.

The vuvuzela joins a list of other words that were uttered by politicians, marketeers and fans during the year.

To many a grown-up’s dismay, right at the top of the list is “belieber”. And yes, you guessed it, its someone who is a fan of the young Canadian pop singer Justin Bieber. The star also made “the Justin Bieber” – his signature haircut – which is also called the flip and switch, the flow, or the twitch.

Other interesting words were “sofalize”, the coffice and i-dosing.

Sofalize is a term created by a British marketing company for people who prefer to stay at home and communicate with others electronically.

The coffice originates from South Korea as a coffee shop frequented by customers who use it as an office for its space, electricity and internet, along with its endless coffee supply.

I-dosing is a supposed digital drug. Certain soundwaves, the claim goes, give listeners a high. Sceptics abound, watchful parents are everywhere.

Several words by American politicians Barack Obama and Sarah Palin also made it on to the annual list.

Political words aside, there’s also a sexist aspect to the list.

While some women would just call them sexist or chauvinists, the list has also brought about a new name for domineering males – the “mansplainer”.

Essentially it’s a man who explains everything and has an opinion on absolutely anything and everything – especially to a woman.

He speaks down and he acts like a know-it-all. - Cape Times