Young activists picketing outside the venue in Madrid, Spain where discussions about combating the effects of climate change are being held. Picture: Brenda Masilela/ ANA
Young activists picketing outside the venue in Madrid, Spain where discussions about combating the effects of climate change are being held. Picture: Brenda Masilela/ ANA

Activist: How many classes must we skip for world to know we're suffering?

By Brenda Masilela Time of article published Dec 9, 2019

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Madrid - Youths from developing countries are concerned about the planet's future and their respective governments' inadequacy at combating climate change. 

The announcement was made by activists from the Americas, Africa and Asia during a press conference on Monday at the United Climate Change Conference - COP25 - in Madrid, Spain. 

The youngsters shared their fears about the extreme weather patterns and pollution damaging their home countries and continents. 

National leaders have been heavily criticised at this year's COP25 for the insufficient mitigation and adaption measures in place to fight climate change.

Nakabuye Flavia, a student from Uganda, described the lack of climate action as "environmental racism".

"Which type of storm or what flavour of floods must Africa taste for us to get climate justice? Every Friday we continue to step out of our comfort zones by missing classes to stress the climate issue. 

"How many more classes must we skip for the world to know that we are suffering the most? Developed countries must be ashamed of themselves," said Flavia.

The activists included Swedish teenager Greta Thunberg, who has been outspoken about the effects of greenhouse gas emissions.

The 16-year-old traveled by train from Lisbon. She refuses to fly because of the high levels of emissions used in air travel, and instead makes use of boats, trains and electric cars.

On Monday, Thunberg said she would give other activists a chance to speak as they were the ones who were more affected than she was.

"I don’t want to speak too much today. I am privileged, but people from the global south need their voices heard more. They are most vulnerable."

African News Agency (ANA)

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