Australia's Prime Minister Scott Morrison speaks to firefighters in Mudgee, New South Wales. Picture: Australian Pool via AP
Australia's Prime Minister Scott Morrison speaks to firefighters in Mudgee, New South Wales. Picture: Australian Pool via AP

Australian PM dismisses climate change criticism from teen activist Greta Thunberg

By DPA Time of article published Dec 23, 2019

Share this article:

Sydney - Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison dismissed

criticism Monday from Swedish teen activist Greta Thunberg that he

was not doing enough to combat climate change.

The 16-year-old activist, who has a global following, used Twitter to

slam the Australian government for failing to make the connection

between the climate crisis and extreme weather and disasters like the

fires that have hit the country.

"Not even catastrophes like these seem to bring any political action.

How is this possible?" Thunberg Tweeted. Asked by reporters about her

message, Morrison said he will do what is right for Australia's

national interests.

"We'll do in Australia what we think is right for Australia...I'm not

here to try to impress people overseas," Morrison said.

Earlier Monday, Morrison said calls in Australia for him to do more

to fight climate change in the face of the bushfire crisis were

"reckless." He said he won't be "panicked" into taking stronger

action.

%%%twitter https://twitter.com/hashtag/AustraliaFires?src=hash&ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#AustraliaFires

That's what has to change.

Now. https://t.co/DQcZViKJQz

— Greta Thunberg (@GretaThunberg)

"We won't embrace reckless targets and abandon traditional industries

that would risk Australian jobs while having no meaningful impact on

the global climate," Morrison wrote in an article published Monday in

the Sydney newspaper Daily Telegraph.

Morrison has long been a strong supporter of the coal industry which

is Australia's biggest export. Three quarters of Australian coal

production is exported and is worth 67 billion dollars (46.2 billion

US dollars) a year.

Morrison wrote there was a need for "real action on climate change"

across all levels, but to suggest increasing Australia's climate

targets would have prevented the current fires raging across the

country or extreme weather events "is simply false."

In an interview on Channel 9 Monday morning Morrison rejected a call

from his deputy and leader of his National Party coalition partner,

Michael McCormack, to do more to combat climate change.

"I never panic. I don't think panicking is the way to manage

anything," Morrison said.

He said he would not be intimidated by the push to do more to combat

climate change which was "politically motivated."

dpa

Share this article: