Donna Phillips shows a charred Route 66 sign she found among the possessions of her friend Marsha Maus after wildfires tore through the Seminole Springs Mobile Home Park in Agoura Hills, California. Maus has been a resident of the neighbourhood for 15 years. Picture: Chris Pizzello/AP
Donna Phillips shows a charred Route 66 sign she found among the possessions of her friend Marsha Maus after wildfires tore through the Seminole Springs Mobile Home Park in Agoura Hills, California. Maus has been a resident of the neighbourhood for 15 years. Picture: Chris Pizzello/AP
Firefighters hose down hot spots from a wildfire along La Virgenes Road in Calabasas, California. Picture: Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP
Firefighters hose down hot spots from a wildfire along La Virgenes Road in Calabasas, California. Picture: Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP
A home stands alone, at left, among the devastation left behind by a wildfire in Malibu. Picture: Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP
A home stands alone, at left, among the devastation left behind by a wildfire in Malibu. Picture: Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP
A wildfire-ravaged property is seen in Malibu. Picture: Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP
A wildfire-ravaged property is seen in Malibu. Picture: Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP
Paul Rasmussen, middle, hugs his neighbour, Randy Berkeley, in the southern California city of Malibu while Berkeley's wife Robyn looks on. Picture: Christopher Weber/AP
Paul Rasmussen, middle, hugs his neighbour, Randy Berkeley, in the southern California city of Malibu while Berkeley's wife Robyn looks on. Picture: Christopher Weber/AP
A wildfire-ravaged property is seen in Malibu. Picture: Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP
A wildfire-ravaged property is seen in Malibu. Picture: Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP
Los Angeles County Fire Chief Daryl Osby says he expects further damage assessments to show that hundreds more homes have been lost on top of the 370 already counted as lost in Southern California's huge wildfires. Picture: Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP
Los Angeles County Fire Chief Daryl Osby says he expects further damage assessments to show that hundreds more homes have been lost on top of the 370 already counted as lost in Southern California's huge wildfires. Picture: Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP
Santos Alvarado, right, and his son Ricky recover a safe deposit box from their destroyed home at Seminole Springs Mobile Home Park following devastating wildfires in the area in Agoura Hills. Picture: Chris Pizzello/AP
Santos Alvarado, right, and his son Ricky recover a safe deposit box from their destroyed home at Seminole Springs Mobile Home Park following devastating wildfires in the area in Agoura Hills. Picture: Chris Pizzello/AP
A firefighting DC-10 makes a fire retardant drop over a wildfire in the mountains near Malibu Canyon Road in Malibu. Picture: Richard Vogel/AP
A firefighting DC-10 makes a fire retardant drop over a wildfire in the mountains near Malibu Canyon Road in Malibu. Picture: Richard Vogel/AP
An American flag is draped over the charred remains of an old pickup truck entering Point Dume along the Pacific coast highway in Malibu. Picture: Richard Vogel/AP
An American flag is draped over the charred remains of an old pickup truck entering Point Dume along the Pacific coast highway in Malibu. Picture: Richard Vogel/AP

Malibu, California - Returning Santa Ana winds have firefighters grappling to corral a devastating Southern California wildfire and hoping new blazes won't erupt.

The Woolsey fire that ravaged areas from north of Los Angeles all the way to coastal Malibu has burned more than 400 buildings, most of them homes, and state fire officials say about 57 000 buildings remain at risk.

Some progress was made thanks to a weekend lull in the winds, and evacuation orders have been lifted for parts of Ventura and Los Angeles counties.

Although the fire is 30 percent contained, state fire Division Chief Chris Anthony says firefighters will be vigilant as the return of hot, dry winds once again increase the risk of explosive fire growth. Fire crews had to stamp out two new fires in the region on Monday before they could do any harm.

Paul Rasmussen shoots video of the charred hillside and his burned 1968 Pontiac across from his property in the southern California city of Malibu. His home survived the fire thanks to his neighbours who fought the flames using buckets and hoses. Picture: Christopher Weber/AP


Randy Berkeley, left, describes for neighbour Paul Rasmussen how he used a hose to battle a 100-foot wall of flames that roared down the hill toward their homes in the southern California city of Malibu. Berkeley and his wife and their son saved their home and Rasmussen's. Picture: Christopher Weber/AP


Robyn Berkeley surveys the charred landscape abutting her home in the southern California city of Malibu. Berkeley recounts using buckets and hoses to beat back flames to save her home and her neighbours' home. Picture: Christopher Weber/AP

AP