Noe Contrez carries a tray of romaine lettuce transplants as he walks next to a planter towed by a tractor at the EG Richter Family Farm in Puyallup, Washington. Owner Tim Richter says that so far his farm hasn't been affected by warnings that romaine lettuce from Yuma, Arizona, apparently has been contaminated with the E. coli bacteria. Picture: Ted S. Warren/AP
Noe Contrez carries a tray of romaine lettuce transplants as he walks next to a planter towed by a tractor at the EG Richter Family Farm in Puyallup, Washington. Owner Tim Richter says that so far his farm hasn't been affected by warnings that romaine lettuce from Yuma, Arizona, apparently has been contaminated with the E. coli bacteria. Picture: Ted S. Warren/AP
This colourized scanning electron microscope image made available by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows E. coli bacteria of the O157:H7 strain that produces a powerful toxin which can cause illness.  Picture: Janice Haney Carr/CDC via AP
This colourized scanning electron microscope image made available by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows E. coli bacteria of the O157:H7 strain that produces a powerful toxin which can cause illness. Picture: Janice Haney Carr/CDC via AP
This undated photo shows romaine lettuce in Houston. Picture: Steve Campbell/Houston Chronicle via AP
This undated photo shows romaine lettuce in Houston. Picture: Steve Campbell/Houston Chronicle via AP
Workers plant romaine lettuce at the EG Richter Family Farm in Puyallup, Washington. Picture: Ted S. Warren/AP
Workers plant romaine lettuce at the EG Richter Family Farm in Puyallup, Washington. Picture: Ted S. Warren/AP
Scientist Karen Xavier holds a petri dish containing a stool sample of small bacteria colonies in Denver. DNA from samples like these are extracted and sequenced to help health investigators more quickly determine the source of a food-borne illness outbreak. Picture: P. Solomon Banda/AP
Scientist Karen Xavier holds a petri dish containing a stool sample of small bacteria colonies in Denver. DNA from samples like these are extracted and sequenced to help health investigators more quickly determine the source of a food-borne illness outbreak. Picture: P. Solomon Banda/AP

NEW YORK (AP) — Four more deaths have been linked to a national food poisoning outbreak blamed on tainted Arizona-grown romaine lettuce, bringing the total to five.

The Arizona growing season is long over and it's unlikely any tainted lettuce is still in stores or people's homes. But there can be a lag in reporting, and reports of illnesses have continued to come in.

In an update Friday, health officials said 25 more cases raised the total to 197 illnesses in 35 states. At least 89 were hospitalized.

Previously one death had been reported, in California. On Friday, health officials said they have learned of four more — two in Minnesota and one each in Arkansas and New York.

Health officials have tied the E. coli outbreak to romaine lettuce grown in Yuma, Arizona.

AP