A stairway crosses the hole left by the whip of Hurricane Maria in the residence of Edgardo de León, which was declared a total loss by FEMA staff, in Cataño, Puerto Rico. Picture: Carlos Giusti/AP
A stairway crosses the hole left by the whip of Hurricane Maria in the residence of Edgardo de León, which was declared a total loss by FEMA staff, in Cataño, Puerto Rico. Picture: Carlos Giusti/AP
Some roofs damaged by the whip of Hurricane Maria are still exposed to rainy weather conditions, in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Picture: Carlos Giusti/AP
Some roofs damaged by the whip of Hurricane Maria are still exposed to rainy weather conditions, in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Picture: Carlos Giusti/AP
Pedro Deschamps helps workers hired by FEMA to carry out the installation of a temporary awning roof at his house, which suffered damage during Hurricane Maria, in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Wednesday, Nov. 15, 2017. A newly created Florida company with an unproven record won more than $30 million in contracts from the Federal Emergency Management Agency to provide emergency tarps and plastic sheeting for repairs to hurricane victims in Puerto Rico. Bronze Star LLC never delivered those urgently needed supplies, which even months later remain in demand on the island.   (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)
Pedro Deschamps helps workers hired by FEMA to carry out the installation of a temporary awning roof at his house, which suffered damage during Hurricane Maria, in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Wednesday, Nov. 15, 2017. A newly created Florida company with an unproven record won more than $30 million in contracts from the Federal Emergency Management Agency to provide emergency tarps and plastic sheeting for repairs to hurricane victims in Puerto Rico. Bronze Star LLC never delivered those urgently needed supplies, which even months later remain in demand on the island. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)
Some roofs damaged by Hurricane Maria have awnings installed in El Gandúl neighbourhood, in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Picture: Carlos Giusti/AP
Some roofs damaged by Hurricane Maria have awnings installed in El Gandúl neighbourhood, in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Picture: Carlos Giusti/AP

Washington — After Hurricane Maria damaged tens of thousands of homes in Puerto Rico, a newly created Florida company won more than $30 million in federal contracts to provide emergency tarps and plastic sheeting for repairs.

Bronze Star LLC never delivered those urgently needed supplies.

Edgardo de León sits in his living room with a hole in the ceiling caused by the whip of hurricane Maria, in Cataño, Puerto Rico. Picture: Carlos Giusti/AP

According to an exclusive Associated Press report, the Federal Emergency Management Agency terminated the contracts this month, without paying any money, and re-started the process to supply more tarps for the U.S. territory.

The original effort took nearly four weeks between the day FEMA awarded the contracts to Bronze Star and the day it canceled them, tying up millions in disaster relief funds.

Thousands of Puerto Ricans remain homeless, and many complain the federal government is taking too long to install tarps.

Associated Press