Protesters gather in Leeds, England, during a protest by Black Voices Matter. Global protests are taking place in the wake of George Floyd’s death who was killed on May 25 while in police custody in the US city of Minneapolis. Picture: Danny Lawson/PA via AP
Protesters gather in Leeds, England, during a protest by Black Voices Matter. Global protests are taking place in the wake of George Floyd’s death who was killed on May 25 while in police custody in the US city of Minneapolis. Picture: Danny Lawson/PA via AP

UN body urges US to publicly acknowledge structural racism

By Albert Otti Time of article published Jun 15, 2020

Share this article:

Geneva - The US government should publicly admit that structural racism exists in the United States, the UN racism watchdog demanded on Monday.

The UN Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination also urged the US administration in a statement to "unequivocally and unconditionally reject and condemn racially motivated killings of African Americans and other minorities."

The committee that is composed of 18 independent experts from around the world called on Washington to step up probes into alleged police misconduct, including excessive force during the ongoing protests against racially motivated police brutality.

The UN body reiterated that there should be systematic anti-racism training for US officials at the federal, state and local levels.

The Human Rights Council, the top UN rights body, is set to discuss entrenched racism in the US and across the world in a rare extraordinary debate on Wednesday.

African countries had requested an urgent debate on racially inspired human rights violations, systemic racism, police brutality and violence against peaceful protest.

The death of George Floyd in police custody in Minneapolis "sparked protests all over the world against the injustice and brutality that People of African Descent face daily in many parts of the world," the African countries said in their proposal letter.

This will be only the fifth urgent debate that the Human Rights Council has held since it was founded in 2006. The previous ones dealt with blocked aid for Palestinians and with the situation in Syria.

The United States gave up its membership in the top UN rights body in 2018. President Donald Trump's administration criticized the council for including known rights violators among its member countries, and for frequently singling out Israel's treatment of Palestinians.

dpa

Share this article:

Related Articles