Tshwane police aim to keep a close eye on car guards amid rising cases of theft out of motor vehicles. Picture: Thobile Mathonsi/African News Agency(ANA)
Tshwane police aim to keep a close eye on car guards amid rising cases of theft out of motor vehicles. Picture: Thobile Mathonsi/African News Agency(ANA)

Profile Tshwane car guards to help curb cases of theft - Hilda Mohajane

By James Mahlokwane Time of article published Mar 8, 2021

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Pretoria - Tshwane car guards must be profiled to help curb the concerning cases of theft out of motor vehicles in places where people rely on them to help keep an eye on their valuables.

This is according to Tshwane Police District Commissioner Major-General Hilda Mohajane, who said the police in the city were in a process to work with centres that have parking, to ensure criminals did not masquerade in the trade and take advantage.

Police have reported an increase in theft out of motor vehicles in centres and areas where there were car guards, who were supposed to help monitor the vehicles when the owners were away.

Mohajane said it made no sense that people’s vehicles were being broken into in shopping centres where car guards were plenty and also receiving some form of gratitude payment for their services from motorists.

She said the the increase in the theft of people’s valuables from their vehicles was one of the reasons the police in Tshwane had intensified Operation Okae Molao in various areas.

Mohajane said the police were working with owners of shopping centres and other centres to ensure that the men and women in reflectors and bibs did not have criminal records.

“We are already working closely with the mall managers and their heads of security to get information about the car guards and we will profile them to check if they have any cases against them.

“This will also help in cases where a vehicle has been broken into and the fingerprints of a car guard appear in that vehicle. We will know that is our suspect and we will pick that person up.

“We want to thank those car guards who have been doing their job diligently and helping people safely park their vehicles, but we also want to want those that are criminals who keep going there because they want to push their missions of breaking into cars. We will deal with that together with the police and malls managers,” she said.

Church Square car guard Tumelo Maake said he was aware that some criminals could take advantage of people but most of them operated in isolated areas because in most busy places the guards knew each other and knew who owned which parking bays.

Motorist Reo Martins said his biggest fear with car guards was that in most cases, motorists could not hold them accountable and know where to begin looking for them.

Katlego Masha said he was curious as to how the police could make having profiles of car guards possible because there were simply way too many in Tshwane, and some of them were actually in the country illegal, meaning they cannot be profiled and their fingerprints were not in any database.

Pretoria News

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