One of the demolished houses built on private land near the Rosslyn dumping site. The destruction of the homes led to a violent protest in which vehicles were torched. Picture: Oupa Mokoena/African News Agency (ANA)
One of the demolished houses built on private land near the Rosslyn dumping site. The destruction of the homes led to a violent protest in which vehicles were torched. Picture: Oupa Mokoena/African News Agency (ANA)

Residents of demolished homes near Rosslyn dumping site want answers

By James Mahlokwane Time of article published Nov 26, 2021

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Pretoria - Residents whose homes were demolished on private land near the Rosslyn dumping site last week have called on the SAPS to engage them for clarity on their lost belongings and land ownership.

Numerous people lost their homes when the police and other authorities demolished their houses, built illegally on private land near the railway line between Soshanguve and Rosslyn.

The incident led to a violent protest during which vehicles were set alight.

The residents said they did not understand why they were being removed from land that had been unfenced and unoccupied for 46 years.

According to ward councillor Enos Chiloane, there was no proof of who owned the land.

He said they wanted to engage the police and the landowner about the land, and why it had been abandoned for decades in a country where people needed land.

The residents bought their stands on the field for between R30  000 and R50  000.

On Wednesday, they gathered at the site demanding clarity and updates following Chiloane’s intervention.

Chiloane said: “As ward leadership we serve the people as long as they need our assistance. However, we cannot get involved in getting their money and who sold them the land.

“Regarding the clarity that they wanted, we met with the police on Monday, but the person said the owner of the land did not show up.

“That is why the people have many questions about the title deed.

“The police were involved when about 150 security officials were deployed here for the demolition of the houses.

“It is for this reason that they want to engage the SAPS on the matter.

“The residents have reason to believe the SAPS may be able to give them clarity on this matter. They also want to know where their furniture was taken, and how they can access their belongings.”

Chiloane said the people were hoping to also engage the landowner and ask serious questions regarding the land, and why it had not been labelled as private land with signs, or been fenced for decades.

The SAPS had not responded by yesterday afternoon.

Pretoria News

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