Nkululeko Luthuli shares the life story of his grandfather Chief Albert Luthuli at the Javett Art Centre at the University of Pretoria during the Albert Luthuli celebration day. Picture: Thobile Mathonsi/African News Agency (ANA)
Nkululeko Luthuli shares the life story of his grandfather Chief Albert Luthuli at the Javett Art Centre at the University of Pretoria during the Albert Luthuli celebration day. Picture: Thobile Mathonsi/African News Agency (ANA)

University of Pretoria celebrates Chief Albert Luthuli 60 years after his Nobel Peace Prize

By Staff Reporter Time of article published Nov 22, 2021

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Betty Moleya

Pretoria - Art and the legacy of Chief Albert Luthuli were combined in a celebratory event at the Javett Art Centre at the University of Pretoria on Saturday to celebrate an anniversary and to honour the activist, politician and Nobel Peace Prize award winner.

The event was one to narrate stories of socio-economic issues in South Africa, as the Faculty of Economic and Management Sciences at the university commemorates 10 years since the establishment of the Albert Luthuli Leadership Institute – formerly known as the Albert Luthuli Centre for Responsible Leadership, and 60 years since Chief Albert Luthuli received the Nobel Peace Prize.

At the event, director of the Albert Luthuli Leadership Institute Professor Derick de Jongh said music, dance, and art provided a unique expression, which is far more impactful than the spoken word.

“2021 is a significant year for us. That is why we decided to explore alternative ways to tell a story about Luthuli, and the kind of a leader he was in South Africa.

“We got the university faculties of Education and Humanities to help amplify the understanding of the work and leadership of Luthuli,” said De Jongh.

There was an art exhibition by third-year students and an ode performed by a musical group.

The event also saw a panel of discussion that had four speakers. Dr Raita Steyn, Professor Thula Simpson, Delene Human, and Natalie Fossey, who spoke about the work and leadership of Luthuli, and how they incorporated that with art.

The speakers highlighted the fact that Luthuli was a teacher despite being a political leader, and how that inspired them to guide their students when creating and designing their artwork.

Nkululeko Luthuli, the grandson of Albert Luthuli, said it was an honour that the Nobel Peace laureate was commemorated, and they would not take it for granted.

“I think the relationship with the university is maturing in a way that it is starting to bring out his work in different ways.

“Back in the days there was very little television or media accessible, so we are bringing back those things alive and honouring him as well,” he said.

Pretoria News

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