A learner takes part in the second annual Work Readiness Programme at Filadelfia Secondary School. Picture: Goitsemang Tlhabye
A learner takes part in the second annual Work Readiness Programme at Filadelfia Secondary School. Picture: Goitsemang Tlhabye

WATCH: With or without disability sky is limit for learners at Filadelfia Secondary School

By Goitsemang Tlhabye Time of article published Jun 15, 2021

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Pretoria - Whether they're seeking a career in making music, being a politician or a dancer, the sky is the limit for learners at the Filadelfia Secondary School with or without a disability.

Learners at the school in Soshanguve Block L were in high spirits about their future prospects as the school launched its second annual Work Readiness Programme.

The programme which took place at the school offered learners the opportunity to hear from industry experts about different career options available for them, how to prepare for life beyond school and how to handle a job interview.

It also spoke to learners on how to draft a winning curriculum vitae and how to access university despite being differently-abled

Derrick Peete, the school principal, said the initiative was important for the school's learners to drive home the message that even if they were disabled there were still many opportunities out there for them.

Peete said they wanted their learners to know that there were people who would be willing to assist them if they concentrate on their studies and doing their best.

He said they opted to bring back the roadshow for a second time as last years learners were very happy and enthusiastic about the motivation given.

"It always gives these learners that extra motivation to see people like them telling them how they became disabled and how they have flourished in their respective careers in spite of their disability."

Peete said it was important to show learners these types of things and have people motivating them as they were still going to face challenges when they reach the workplace.

As it stands he said visually impaired learners often ended up working with telephones and things were even more difficult for deaf learners as they needed someone to assist them when going to university and in the workplace.

"Society needs to accept them as they are and give them an opportunity as they are because they are clever enough and in some cases, they do better than us who call ourselves normal people."

Pretoria News

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