Mike Seloane
MORE than 700 senior government managers are in hot water for failing to declare their business interests and directorships in several private and public companies.

The Public Service Commission (PSC) yesterday said an investigation had found that 721 public servants had failed to disclose that they were directors at various companies which were possibly doing business with the state.

Now the PSC wants President Cyril Ramaphosa and the provincial premiers to act against those officials who have been implicated.

PSC commissioner Mike Seloane said their findings cover the period between January and March this year. He said the PSC had scrutinised all the received financial disclosure forms of senior managers and they conducted their own investigations to determine whether their disclosures were truthful.

“The scrutiny of the financial disclosure forms revealed that a total of 721 members in both national and provincial departments did not disclose their directorships in private and public companies. This is in contravention of Regulation 19 of the Public Service Regulation, 2016,” Seloane said.

According to the PSC, 1943 senior managers in both national and provincial departments have directorships in private and public companies.

Seloane said 721 did not disclose their directorships and the PSC had to conduct its own independent investigations to uncover the financial disclosure misconduct.

“The national departments have a total number of 485 (43%) of senior managers who did not disclose their directorships and 236 senior managers are in the provinces.

“Gauteng province has the highest number of 77 (36%) of senior managers and Mpumalanga (has) the lowest with four senior managers who did not disclose their directorships."

The number of senior managers doing remunerative work in national departments was 183, of whom only 72 had written ap- proval - 19 of them are deputy directors-general (DDGs) and two directors-general (DGs), while 38 are chief directors and 124 directors. All, including those with written approvals, cumulatively earned more than R16million.

Of the nine provinces, the Western Cape had the highest number of DGs doing remunerative work. Of the 49 officials doing remunerative work, 24 were DGs, 3 DDGs, five chief directors and 17 directors. Written approvals were given to only 22 officials. They earned more than R1.7m.

North West had 14 officials doing remunerative work and none had written approval. Three of the officials were DGs, two DDGs, three chief directors and six directors and they collectively generated an income of more than R2.2m.

In KwaZulu-Natal, the PSC found that 22 officials were doing remunerative work - one DG, two DDGs, three chief directors and 16 directors, but only 14 of them had written approval. They generated an income of more than R2.1m.

In Gauteng, one DDG, six chief directors and 17 directors were doing remunerative work, and only four had permission. They generated an income of R723880.

The Eastern Cape had five directors doing remunerative work, none of whom had permission to do so. They had an income of more than R400000.

The PSC said all the officials in national and provincial departments doing remunerative work collectively generated an income of R28.9m. “The PSC further reveals that a total of 481 senior managers in both national and provincial departments received gifts and/or sponsorships during the period. The total value of gifts and/or sponsorships received by these senior managers amounted to R7664557.82,” Seloane said.

National departments topped the list of gift recipients. A total of 311 of them received gifts amounting to more than R5.1m.

KwaZulu-Natal topped the list of provinces. Thirty officials - two DGs, two DDGs, five chief directors and 21 directors - collectively earned gifts worth R896136. In Gauteng 40 officials - one DG, eight DDGs, 14 chief directors and 17 directors - received gifts worth R678520.