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‘Neighbourhoods should enforce dress codes to increase property values’

A Twitter user feels that neighbourhood dress codes will increase property values. Picture: Andrea Piacquadio/Pexels

A Twitter user feels that neighbourhood dress codes will increase property values. Picture: Andrea Piacquadio/Pexels

Published Jul 30, 2022

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A Twitter post suggesting that property values may increase in areas where dress codes are implemented has gone viral on the platform, with most people suggesting that implementing such a policy would be worthy of protests.

User @Cooperstreaming even suggested that such protests should see people walking around topless on their own properties.

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“Seems like a win win (sic) to me.”

In a post reading “New advancements in increasing property values” Twitter user @sushil_js shared a screenshot of another user’s tweet:

Twitter/sushil_js

Some responders took the suggestion quite seriously, slamming the concept of closed neighbourhood eco-systems and regulation of planned visitors. Similarly, @abelincoln_ said such regulations would have the opposite effect on property values.

“This would do the opposite, this would make property values decline, because nobody wants to live in a neighbourhood that tells them what they can wear on their own damn property.”

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Most people, however, laughed off the idea.

Twitter/@mistortewdee
Twitter/@JuanDenver5

Interestingly though, @Allisonmward wrote: “I once had a real estate agent selling the house across the street ask me if I could dress more appropriately while they were on the market. I was wearing pyjamas with shorts to check my mailbox...”

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Another Tweep posted:

Twitter/@bcpines

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This story is a reminder of another Twitter post that has been commonly used on social media since 2018.

Twitter/@SayDatAgain

This post received the following reactions:

Twitter/@MrStreatrr
Twitter

Ultimately though, while the above posts may have some cheeky truths to them, Tweeps have decided that the concept of dress codes will never work – and most people would never want it to anyway.

IOL BUSINESS

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