Dwayne Dodzo runs through a sparring session at the MADfit MMA gym. He will make his pro debut on the 25 of March at a Jackie Brice Promotions event. Picture: Tamryn Christians, MzansiMMA
Dwayne Dodzo runs through a sparring session at the MADfit MMA gym. He will make his pro debut on the 25 of March at a Jackie Brice Promotions event. Picture: Tamryn Christians, MzansiMMA

A boxer with brains is a good thing, says Dwayne Dodzo

By Julian Kiewietz Time of article published Mar 10, 2021

Share this article:

CAPE TOWN – Dwayne Dodzo is not only busy schooling people with his fists, but he too has a very important message for upcoming boxers.

The Zimbabwean – who was set to face Setshaba Mapukhata at Fight Africa 01 – highlighted the importance of finding something to fall back on when it’s all said and done.

Anything can happen in sport and there are no guarantees for professional athletes, especially in an art as taxing as Boxing. Even fighters who are privileged enough to enjoy long careers need to put things in place to financially secure their future.

“As a fighter, you want and need something to fall back on, this is a short-time sport and a lot can happen,” says Dwayne who completed a personal training course with hopes of still furthering his studies while building his future in the boxing arena.

The man is cognisant of the massive spike in interest in combat sport lately, and with brands such as Fight Africa investing on South African shores he knows it is a good time to be in boxing, however, he still understands the value in having options.

“The rise in interest in boxing again is exciting, brother, we’re not just fighting for the sake of it, we can now make a living out of it. If you look overseas, guys are making a living from boxing which gives us hope to say ‘I want to reach this goal and when I reach it, I will have something to fall back on’.

“I might go into coaching, but I definitely plan on furthering my studies as I can then have something to look forward to. Education is key, and a boxer with brains is a good thing. You don't want to just fight and then retire and become a nobody.”

At the time of this story going to print, it was understood that Dwayne’s opponent pulled out of their fight at the Pollsmoor Correctional Facility on Friday, and it was unclear as to why.

This is the second time Dwayne has had to put his pro debut on hold, the first time being a deeply sad situation for him.

“Shortly before my fight at the Jackie Brice Promotions event in December last year, my sister passed away.

“It was an extremely emotional time for me because we were so close, she was one of my biggest supporters, she used to stay in Johannesburg, she would always come down and support me when I had a fight, so for me losing her at that point … it really upset me,” says the young Zimbabwean fighting out of MADfit MMA gym.

“I had to choose between my fight and my sister, and at the end of the day I realised that it would be an honour for me to take her home and give a good burial. It was better that way instead of letting her wait in the mortuary for me while I prepare for a fight.

“I know she is with me today in everything I do and I believe that she is proud of me and is watching me succeed,” he concluded.

Dwayne, was informed that he will be guaranteed a fight on the 25th of March on a Jackie Brice Promotion card, however, Friday's Fight Africa card still promises to be something special with an array of fights on the card including the WBF junior middleweight title fight between Cristiano Ndombassy and Jami Webb.

Due to the Covid-19 pandemic and its subsequent lockdown regulations, no fans will be allowed in the arena, however, as of today, thousands of fans have locked in their tickets for the pay-per-view event which will be streamed via Sport Entertainment

International (SEI). Tickets cost R150 for the entire card.

For more information, check out Fight Africa’s Facebook page or go to SEI to book your tickets.

Related video

@juliankiewietz

IOL Sport

Share this article: