There will be greater clarity about the future of suspended Cricket South Africa chief executive Thabang Moroe by the end of the week when the first part of a report from a team of independent forensic auditors will be handed over to the organisations Members’ Council. Photo: BackpagePix
There will be greater clarity about the future of suspended Cricket South Africa chief executive Thabang Moroe by the end of the week when the first part of a report from a team of independent forensic auditors will be handed over to the organisations Members’ Council. Photo: BackpagePix

CSA to give more clarity on Moroe's future this week

By Zaahier Adams Time of article published Jun 16, 2020

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There will be greater clarity about the future of suspended Cricket South Africa chief executive Thabang Moroe by the end of the week when the first part of a report from a team of independent forensic auditors will be handed over to the organisations Members’ Council.

Moroe was suspended at the start of December last year on the back of twin reports from Cricket SA’s Audit and Risk and Social and ethics Committees. The matter came to a head last week when Moroe turned up for work at CSA’s offices - which were empty as staff were told to work from home in line with measures related to the national Covid-19 lockdown - believing his suspension was over. 

Although Moroe was granted access to the building “because it was cold outside”, CSA have stressed that his suspension remains in place until the forensic investigation is completed. The federation’s president, Chris Nenzani stressed this point again on Tuesday evening in a tele-conference.

“The first part of the forensic investigation will be handed over by Friday,” Nenzani said. “The letter outlining his suspension is explicit - it states that (his suspension) is  linked to his on-going investigation. The letter that is in his possession is very clear.”

Moroe’s legal representatives last week indicated that CSA had breached its own disciplinary code in how it dealt with the suspension, something Nenzani acknowledged. 

CSA have come under major criticism, particularly from the South African Cricketers Association (SACA), for the delay in dealing with Moroe’s case. CSA are currently still paying Moroe is full salary that amounts to close to R2-million already during his suspended term in addition to the salary of acting chief executive Jacques Faul.

Nenzani admitted that the delay “is not in interest of its stakeholders” and that it values “the relationship of necessity” with Saca.

“The processes we went through had to be elaborate and expansive. It did not sit with the board, but the Members Council,” he said.

“Our relationship with SACA is important because it’s a relationship of necessity. It is important to us to strive to make the relationship work and deal with the issues that characterise this relationship. I am sure SACA will understand you can't be cavalier with these things as you are exposing yourself. The delay is not to the benefit of CSA, its players, supporters and stakeholders.

“We understand the unhappiness of SACA and our stakeholders, but very few would have wanted us to flout procedures. We will be able to charter a way forward in the next few weeks.”

Nenzani clarified that Moroe, though, has not undergone a disciplinary hearing as yet.

“We need to ensure our procedures are correct. You have to have all your ducks in a row,” he said.

He also reiterated that CSA’s Board of Directors, which he chairs, has no intention of stepping down before the scheduled Annual General Meeting in September, stating once again that “it would have been an easy way out for the Board to say there's a problem and then run away (last December). We have a responsibility to correct what went wrong.”

CSA will unveil a new tournament on Wednesday that will be first cricket played in South Africa since COVID-19 enforced a halt on all cricket in March.

@Zaahier Adams 


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