Sharks flank Daniel du Preez looks for support during the Sharks' Currie Cup semi-final win over the Bulls. Photo: Gerhard Duraan/BackpagePix
Sharks flank Daniel du Preez looks for support during the Sharks' Currie Cup semi-final win over the Bulls. Photo: Gerhard Duraan/BackpagePix
Sharks coach Robert du Preez. Photo: Gavin Barker/BackpagePix
Sharks coach Robert du Preez. Photo: Gavin Barker/BackpagePix

DURBAN - As a player Robert du Preez was ultra-competitve, as a coach he is possibly more so, and on the eve of the Currie Cup final between the Sharks and Western Province, the 54-year-old refreshingly cut through the hype and hot air that will always accompany a major sporting event.

How are the Sharks going to play? Have they anything special up their sleeves for a Province team that caught them off guard three weeks ago in Durban? Do the Sharks kick too much (they kicked more than any other team in three months of pool play)?

The taciturn coach mustered a wry grin before explaining how it will be for the Sharks: “Look, too much is made of ball-in-hand rugby (or any particular brand). We want to play winning rugby. If that means we have to kick the ball a lot, we will do that.

“This year we have played to our strengths, which is our pack of forwards. Having said that, our backs have on many occasions done well for us. So we can do both, and it comes down to what the situation requires,” he said.

“We want to build a way of playing that suits the Sharks and it does not happen overnight. We are not a New Zealand rugby team, we are a South African team, and we want to play a South African brand of rugby.”

Du Preez’s Sharks have led the Currie Cup from the front this season, evolving their way of playing, and it has come down to the same key elements. Uncompromising forward play and winning the gain line battle to provide the backs with opportunities to play what is in front of them, be that flyhalf Curwin Bosch spreading the ball or probing for territory with the boot.

And when without the ball, the Sharks have been brutal on defence. 

How the Sharks play is not rocket science and if Province are to stop them, they know their forwards are going to have to trade blows in the trenches.

The Capetonians understand this full well from what transpired in the 80 minutes of their recent win in Durban. That match summed up the Sharks. For 30 minutes, at full throttle, they steam-rolled the opposition.

After the match, Province coach John Dobson admitted that he thought his side were goners given how the Sharks dominated that half an hour. But then the Sharks took their foot off the pedal. Suddenly the opposition could play, and they certainly did, spearheaded by flyhalf Robert du Preez jnr.

That WP win was possibly the best thing that could have happened to the Sharks because it laid bare their strengths and weaknesses, and empathised the ruthlessness and efficiency that is required to be a champion team.

“Three months of hard work comes down to one game. There is nothing more we can do now,” Du Preez said philosophically. “I am incredibly proud of the players. Now it is about being calm and composed.”

Du Preez has made one change to his squad. Injured wing Sbu Nkosi is replaced by Odwa Ndungane and the latter’s place on the bench is taken by Rhyno Smith.

The Mercury

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