SA Rugby president Mark Alexander with Springbok coach Allister Coetzee. Photo: Aubrey Kgakatsi/BackpagePix
SA Rugby president Mark Alexander with Springbok coach Allister Coetzee. Photo: Aubrey Kgakatsi/BackpagePix
South Africa are one of only two countries to have hosted the rugby, soccer and cricket world cups.
South Africa are one of only two countries to have hosted the rugby, soccer and cricket world cups.
There are already several world-class stadiums around the country.
There are already several world-class stadiums around the country.

SA Rugby will present their bid to host the 2023 Rugby World Cup to the World Rugby Council in London on Monday, September 25.

These graphics below illustrate South Africa’s strong technical bid, world-class stadia, financial guarantees, and strong commercial model. 

The three countries in the running to host the 2023 Rugby World Cup are South Africa, Ireland and France.

Each country will present their bid to Council next Monday, after which each will host a media conference.

South Africa’s presentation will take place at 11.30am to 12.20pm (UK time) at the Royal Garden Hotel in Kensington, London, and the three countries’ media conferences afterwards will be live-streamed by World Rugby.

South Africa are one of only two countries to have hosted the rugby, soccer and cricket world cups. Graphic: SA Rugby
There are already several world-class stadiums around the country. Graphic: SA Rugby

South Africa’s bid will be led by deputy president Cyril Ramaphosa, who will be joined by Sports Minister Thulas Nxesi, deputy minister Gert Oosthuizen, SA Rugby president Mark Alexander and CEO Jurie Roux.

World Rugby will announce the preferred candidate determined by an independent technical assessment on Tuesday, 31 October.

The final decision will be taken by World Rugby Council on Wednesday, 15 November, also in London.