A woman stands in front of etchings 'Bible' (1956) by Marc Chagall in the exhibition 'Marc Chagall - I'm certain Rembrandt loves me' in Jena, Germany, Friday, Sept. 14, 2018. On display are paintings, drawings and artist's books of Georges Braque, Marc Chagall, Fernand Leger, Henri Matisse, Joan Miro, Pablo Picasso, Georges Rouault and other artists. The exhibition started on Sept. 2, 2018 and last until Nov. 18, 2018. (AP Photo/Jens Meyer)
A woman stands in front of etchings 'Bible' (1956) by Marc Chagall in the exhibition 'Marc Chagall - I'm certain Rembrandt loves me' in Jena, Germany, Friday, Sept. 14, 2018. On display are paintings, drawings and artist's books of Georges Braque, Marc Chagall, Fernand Leger, Henri Matisse, Joan Miro, Pablo Picasso, Georges Rouault and other artists. The exhibition started on Sept. 2, 2018 and last until Nov. 18, 2018. (AP Photo/Jens Meyer)

Exhibition to look at Indian and Coloured segregation in Durban

By Mervyn Naidoo Time of article published Sep 20, 2018

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DURBAN: DELVING into the racial histories of Indian and Coloured people and how segregation under the Group Areas Act happened in Durban is what the curators of a forthcoming exhibition titled Proclamation 73 hope to achieve.

The exhibition is scheduled for the Durban Art Gallery from December 10 to February 15. It is the brainchild of Zara Julius and Chandra Frank.

Proclamation 73 has also drawn the backing of Goethe-Institut South Africa as part of the Goethe-Institut Project Space (GPS) and eThekwini History Museums.

Through photos, Proclamation 73 will depict the everyday lives of Durban families.

In a joint press statement the exhibitors said: “Proclamation 73 investigates and challenges how different racial histories and segregation operate within the city of Durban. The growing collection includes photos of weddings, beach days, ballroom dances, debutante balls, dance contests, street portraits, school pictures and other snapshots. The exhibition will cover a large time period, from the late 1860s until the very early 2000s. Therefore, it offers insight into different historical frameworks and the fragmented histories and narratives.

“This is an interactive non-profit project and we are calling on support to help develop an archival collection of the family album in Durban. We are hoping to grow this body of untold stories, and help document everyday memories and histories."

The pair have appealed to families based from areas like Sydenham, Greenwood Park, Chatsworth, Wentworth, Phoenix, Newlands East, Newlands West and Overport to submit any archival objects or photos that capture gatherings of family, friends and communities.

To contribute / collaborate, contact Zara: [email protected] 

Sunday Tribune

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