Unemployed graduates march for jobs in the streets of Durban. Picture: Kwanda Njoli
Unemployed graduates march for jobs in the streets of Durban. Picture: Kwanda Njoli
Unemployed graduates march for jobs in the streets of Durban. Picture: Kwanda Njoli
Unemployed graduates march for jobs in the streets of Durban. Picture: Kwanda Njoli
Unemployed graduates march for jobs in the streets of Durban. Picture: Kwanda Njoli
Unemployed graduates march for jobs in the streets of Durban. Picture: Kwanda Njoli
Unemployed graduates march for jobs in the streets of Durban. Picture: Kwanda Njoli
Unemployed graduates march for jobs in the streets of Durban. Picture: Kwanda Njoli
Unemployed graduates march for jobs in the streets of Durban. Picture: Kwanda Njoli
Unemployed graduates march for jobs in the streets of Durban. Picture: Kwanda Njoli

DURBAN - An unemployed graduate who raised funds to go to university by driving minibus taxis and washing cars, says his efforts were futile as he still remains unemployed.

Mayville resident Msizi Mbotho, 29, is a University of South Africa graduate who studied towards a teaching qualification, has been unemployed for two years since he graduated.

“Teaching jobs are available but it is not easy to get employment because our approval letters are not being signed by the Department of Education in order for us to get allocated to schools. There was a school that was ready to accept me but they could not hire me because I do not have an approval letter from the department, “ said the dejected Mbotho.

He was one of hundreds of unemployed graduates who took to the streets of Durban on Wednesday in order to raise awareness about the struggle for employment which is faced by many graduates.

Msizi Mbotho drove minibus taxis to raise funds to study. Two years after graduating, he cannot find work as a qualified teacher. Video: Kwandokuhle Njoli

They were following up on a march they staged to the eThekwini Municipality in July this year.

Another graduate, Amanda Khumalo, 23, who is a masters student in public policy at the University of KwaZulu-Natal Amanda Khumalo,23 says hopes that government wakes up and realizes that youth unemployment is a social issue.

“I wish the government understood the urgency of employing graduates because we are depressed. I had to study my masters, which is luckily free at UKZN because I did not want to go home to the questions of, ‘when are you getting a job’,” she said.

“After my masters I will have to do my PhD and add further to my accumulating debt of student loans because I have been applying for jobs with no luck,” she said.

Despite the no-fee tuition at masters level, she is still charged thousands for residence by the institution.

Unemployed graduates march for jobs in the streets of Durban. Picture: Kwanda Njoli
Unemployed graduates march for jobs in the streets of Durban. Picture: Kwanda Njoli

Nkululeko Ndlovu, an unemployed graduate from the Mangosuthu University of Technology, who led the march, said they were tired of marching to the Durban City Hall, the seat of the local eThekwini Municipality. He said no officials had accepted their memorandums at the two previous marches.

“This is the third time we are coming to deliver our memorandum at City Hall, however no one ever comes to listen to our demands. This shows you how we are neglected. We are told to go to school for 3-5 years only to end up broke, broken and neglected,” .

Mayor Zandile Gumede’s political advisor, Mlungisi Ntombela, accepted the memorandum on the city’s behalf, but said local government could not eradicate unemployment alone.

He said the city had engage the Office of the Premier on the issue.

Unemployed graduates march for jobs in the streets of Durban. Picture: Kwanda Njoli
Unemployed graduates march for jobs in the streets of Durban. Picture: Kwanda Njoli

SUNDAY TRIBUNE