Deaf learners pictured (L-R) Njabulo Ngubo, Siziwe Mthethwa, Nkanyiso Bhengu, Shanel Gareeb and Adrian Moodley. Photo supplied.
Deaf learners pictured (L-R) Njabulo Ngubo, Siziwe Mthethwa, Nkanyiso Bhengu, Shanel Gareeb and Adrian Moodley. Photo supplied.

DEAFinition launches free South African sign language mobile app

By Dieketseng Maleke Time of article published Sep 2, 2021

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SEPTEMBER marks the Global Deaf Awareness Month, and in support, non-profit company DEAFinition has launched a sign language mobile application as part of its numerous initiatives to promote learning of South African Sign Language.

The app was launched on Wednesday, and it is free. It is available to download on Google Play and the App Store.

DEAFinition director Shubnum Nabbi-Maharaj said: “The goal of this app is to bridge the communication gap between deaf and the hearing by allowing people to simply search for a word or specific phrase on any mobile device that has the free app installed."

According to the non-profit some of the initiatives it is involved in include expert advice and guidance on deaf recruitment, workplace experience, and relevant skills training.

Its services include Recruitment and Placement services, Interpreter Services, Accessibility Services, Educational Services, and SASL courses.

“We have also recently launched an online course offering a basic introduction to SASL at a nominal cost of only R250 per person. The training is self-paced, allowing you to work through the content at your leisure.

“The link to the training is available for a month from the date of purchase, and in conclusion, you can download a certificate of completion. This course is aimed at anyone interested in learning more about the deaf community, their culture, and SASL signs to support everyday conversations,” said Nabbi-Maharaj.

Recently DEAFinition partnered with international award-winning film producers to create two short films.

"The first, titled Speak Out is a hard-hitting, authentic glimpse into the world of a deaf person that effectively highlights the lack of access to services for deaf people in South Africa and encourages people to learn sign language. The second video, aptly titled Where do Deaf people work? provides an overview of the many industries in which deaf people are employed and promotes the recruitment of deaf people through DEAFinition," said Nabbi-Maharaj.

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