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Sister’s Keeper Movement holds silent march in memory of Tshegofatso Pule and her unborn child

An organisation for women, sisters Keeper movement held a silent march in memory of Tshegofatso Pule and her unborn child in Meadowlands, Soweto. Picture: Supplied.

An organisation for women, sisters Keeper movement held a silent march in memory of Tshegofatso Pule and her unborn child in Meadowlands, Soweto. Picture: Supplied.

Published Mar 1, 2021

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Johannesburg - An organisation for women, Sister’s Keeper Movement, held a silent march in memory of Tshegofatso Pule and her unborn child in Soweto on Sunday.

Many women dressed in black and pink T-shirts marched through the streets of Meadowlands where Pule lived.

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Pule was murdered by Muzikayise Malephane in June last year. He pleaded guilty on February 16 to her murder and was sentenced to 20 years in prison. He told the South Gauteng High Court that he had been offered R70 000 by Ntuthuko Shoba to murder Pule, who was allegedly pregnant with Shoba’s child.

The organisation, led by Olebogeng Moemisi, who is the founder as well as a resident of Meadowlands, told The Star the march was their way of demonstrating their frustration and to reach out to mothers who are protecting their children who are perpetrators of crime.

“This march comes after a voice note of the mother of Tshegofatso’s boyfriend (Shoba) made the rounds two days after her funeral.

In the voice note, she was thanking members of her church for prayers for her son.

“We as the Sister’s Keepers Movement want to give a stern warning to mothers not to side with their perpetrator children. Should their kids be accused or implicated in vile acts, (they should) listen and assist,” said Moemisi.

They were angered by the voice note as it came across as insensitive, she said. The marchers went around Meadowlands and sang at times.

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They marched to the church of the accused’s mother, the Shoba family home, to Pule’s home, then to the police station to urge the police to work with them in helping victims who come forward.

Penny Lebyane, who has been vocal on social media platforms against gender-based violence, marched with them.

Moemisi told The Star they marched to the police station to say enough is enough. “We have had it with people not being brought to book,” she said.

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The march comes ahead of Shoba’s court appearance on Monday.

The Star

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