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Kruger National Park safe despite fire season

Kruger National Park spokesman Isaac Phaahla says staff behind the scenes are doing everything in their power to protect visitors from wildfires. Picture: Pixabay.

Kruger National Park spokesman Isaac Phaahla says staff behind the scenes are doing everything in their power to protect visitors from wildfires. Picture: Pixabay.

Published Nov 5, 2021

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Travellers to Kruger National Park this summer can rest assured that staff behind the scenes are doing everything in their power to stop any out-of-control fires in the award-winning reserve. This is according to KNP spokesman Isaac Phaahla.

Three fires have been reported in the park since September, but no major damage has been done.

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"Fires are a common and natural occurrence in KNP. The savanna biome (also referred to as tropical grasslands) and the fynbos biome (Cape Floristic Region) are dependent on fires to keep the ecosystem functioning healthily.

"This is why Kruger National Park has taken proactive steps to ensure that travellers and animals alike are protected during this fire season. In fact, travelling to the national park is safe," he said.

Phaahla explained that the team was constantly monitoring areas within the park.

"With temperatures of 38 degrees on average in summer, we are always vigilant so we can act if a fire starts," he said.

Phaahla said they used controlled burns to help reduce wildfires.

"These control fires help us to manage the fires from spreading and pose no threat to the animals.

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"These are also not highly-charged fires, so animals know when to take cover and when to come back," he said.

If travellers see a fire, Phaahla says they should report it immediately.

"Our guests have really done an outstanding job to make us aware of potential fires. Guests are given permits when they enter the park which include emergency numbers for our control rooms and camps. Reports will help us identify fires and control them," he added.

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