Hilton Garden Inn, Hilton’s midscale hotel brand, is celebrating strong growth in Africa with four open properties and an additional 14 in the pipeline just three years

Hilton Garden Inn, Hilton’s midscale hotel brand, is celebrating strong growth in Africa with four open properties and an additional 14 in the pipeline just three years after opening its first hotel on the continent in 2016.

Many of these properties represent first-in-country openings for Hilton Garden Inn and for the Hilton enterprise as a whole, including Botswana, Zambia and Uganda. 

Speaking from Africa’s Travel Indaba, John Greenleaf, global head, Hilton Garden Inn said, “We have positioned Hilton Garden Inn for success in Africa with a prototype developed specifically for the region. This prototype has been curated to meet the expectations of both travelers and owners throughout Africa, while maintaining the brand’s signature light, bright and airy design as well as the consistent, core guest offerings and amenities that the brand is recognized for around the world.”

Each hotel is built in the Hilton Garden Inn tradition featuring modern guest rooms perfect for work and comfort. Guests may unwind in a relaxing social setting, enjoying handcrafted cocktails, light bites or dinner. 

The Shop, a 24-hour, grab-and-go retail space, offers an upscale mix of healthy, indulgent and fresh foods, varietal beverages and a self-serve specialty coffee bar.

As Hilton Garden Inn expands in Africa, the Hilton enterprise as a whole is also expected to double its footprint across Africa from 44 hotels today to almost 100 over the next several years. Hilton, which is celebrating its 100th anniversary this month, has a rich legacy of hospitality leadership in the region.

As shared in The Hilton Effect, Hilton was the first international hotel brand in the newly created capital of Abuja more than 30 years ago. 

Hilton produced infrastructure, created sewage and electric systems, built factories, paved roads and recruited Team Members from around the world to quickly teach locals – many of whom had never set foot in a hotel – to deliver five-star service to nearly 1,000 government officials.