For 2019, people are once again turning to well-being retreats for a chance to escape, unplug, reset and start anew.
According to the Global Wellness Institute, worldwide wellness was a $4.2 trillion (R58 trillion) industry in 2017, with $639 billion (R8 760 billion) dedicated to “wellness tourism.”

For 2019, people are once again turning to well-being retreats for a chance to escape, unplug, reset and start anew - and the definition of “wellness” continues to expand:

 “We have noticed a spike in travel requests that are spearheaded by a keen interest in wellness and spirituality,” says Sarah Casewit, co-founder of Naya Traveler, an international, women-run company that specializes in custom itineraries.

People’s understanding of wellness goes well beyond a fancy spa and an infinity pool: It's a wholesome, all-encompassing theme that explores the healing elements of physical treatments, as well as spirituality, cuisine and art, within the cultural context.”

Economic context:

* From 2015-2017, the wellness economy grew 6.4% annually, nearly twice as fast as global economic growth (3.6%).
* Wellness expenditures ($4.2 trillion) are now more than half as large as total global health expenditures ($7.3 trillion).
* The wellness industry now represents 5.3% of global economic output.

The report was released at the 12th annual Global Wellness Summit held at Technogym Village in Cesena, Italy, which has attracted 630+ industry leaders from 50 nations.

The 2018 edition features more global, regional and national data and analysis than ever before – from the fact that Europe is the fastest growing spender on workplace wellness to the finding that China and India are the fastest growing wellness tourism markets. 

Among the 10 wellness markets analyzed, revenue growth leaders from 2015-2017 (per annum) were:

1) the spa industry (9.8%), 
2) wellness tourism (6.5%) 
3) wellness real estate (6.4%).