Nosicelo Tsipa, 35, was last seen alive on September 6 and was found dead on September 8 with her legs and arms broken. She was also burnt. Picture: Supplied.
Nosicelo Tsipa, 35, was last seen alive on September 6 and was found dead on September 8 with her legs and arms broken. She was also burnt. Picture: Supplied.

Family of Gender-based violence victim yearning for justice

By Shanice Naidoo Time of article published Nov 21, 2020

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Nosicelo Tsipa, 35, was last seen alive on September 6 and was found dead on September 8 with her legs and arms broken. She was also burnt. Picture: Supplied.

Cape Town - AS 16 Days of Activism approaches we remember those that have lost their lives to gender-based violence (GBV).

Nosicelo Tsipa, 35, was last seen alive on September 6 and was found dead on September 8 with her legs and arms broken. Her body was also burnt.

Tsipa was discovered in a shallow grave not far her home in Fisantekraal.

Her husband and father of her 16-year-old son, Babsy Ntamehlo, now stands accused of her murder.

Her aunt, Brenda Tsipa, said the family is very angry and just wants to see justice served.

“There were problems in the marriage. He was an abusive husband. He would go out and come back and beat her. There were times when their son had to intervene and tell his dad to stop. She had three interdicts against him. We told her to leave him but she thought things would change,” said Brenda.

She added that Nosicelo’s son just sits and looks like he is stuck.

“She was kind, giving, helpful, sweet and so humble,” said Brenda.

National Prosecuting Authority spokesperson Eric Ntabazalila said Ntamehlo had been charged with her murder.

“The case has been postponed at the Bellville Magistrate's Court to November 24 for a further bail application. The state will be opposing bail,” said Ntabazalila.

Chairperson of the DA Women’s Network (Dawn) Ncumisa Mahangu said they can’t believe how long the bail application is dragging as he has appeared in court more than four times and they want to see justice served.

“Dawn is saddened that the case is dragging and more trauma to her siblings and her 16-year-old. We call upon the Bellville court to decide on the bail application and, we call for no bail, he must rot in jail if proven guilty. On Wednesday it is the start of 16 days of activism against GBV but I believe 365 days against it is the only option to observe the fight against GBV.”

She has called upon all men who say not in their name to join the GBV fight in their communities.

“I call upon the government to support all family victims, whether poor or rich, not only high profile cases must be prioritised,” said Mahangu.

Siya Monakali from Ilitha Labantu which provides services for women and children affected by violence said violence against women and children in South Africa occurs at an incomprehensible scale,

“With the femicide rate five times the global average, South Africa is indeed a society that preys on its women and children. South Africa has one of the world’s most progressive Constitutions with laws and policies which seek to protect the rights and dignity of women and children, however, the problems lie in the enforcement of these laws. South Africa needs to implement more proactive measures to try and tackle the issue of gender inequality in our society because this is where gender-based violence stems from, there also needs to be more concise efforts at educating communities about the scourge of gender-based violence,” said Monakali.

He added that South Africa needs to strengthen existing measures.

“It is also vital that there ought to be a thorough evaluation of existing legislation because on paper our policies look good, however, in reality there are grey areas that need to be adhered to. Lastly, our criminal justice system needs to treat all cases of violence against women and children with the same level of seriousness and urgency they require, because far too often perpetrators are given light sentences for serious crimes,” said Monakali.

For this year’s 16 days of activism campaign, Ilitha Labantu will embark on a new campaign called #Uthuleleni (Why are you quiet), the campaign seeks to encourage communities to speak out against the scourge of GBV. The campaign targets hot spot areas in the Cape Flats region.

They kicked off the campaign in Samora Machel and Nyanga, where they collaborated with the police in a series of motorcades to help break the silence and the stigma of violence and abuse in these communities.

Weekend Argus

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