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Well wishes for Madiba

nelson-mandela

Former president Nelson Mandela need only check the internet to find out if the world still cares about him, with messages of goodwill ticking over on social network feeds. News websites filled the information vacuum on his health with invitations to post a message to the political icon. Mandela was admitted to Johannesburg's Milpark Hospital for “routine tests” on Wednesday.

After a recent report from his friend Anglican Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu that he was frail and a hoax over his death, media have converged on the facility, ready to send out any information on one of the world's most loved and admired people.

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Children at the Mc Auley House Independent Catholic School are ecstatic that their beloved Madiba has been discharged from Milpark Hospital. Photo: APMessages to wish Nelson Mandela well, made and put up by children, are seen on a fence of a school near Milpark Hospital in Johannesburg. National and international media hovered outside awaiting news of the former president's health after being admitted for what was called "routine tests".  Photo: SapaChildren show a message to wish Nelson Mandela well at their school  near Milpark Hospital in Johannesburg. National and international media hovered outside awaiting news of the former president's health after being admitted for what was called "routine tests".  Photo: SapaStudents from a school adjacent to the hospital where former South African President Nelson Mandela is said to be undergoing routine tests display a get well card from their classroom window.  National and international media hovered outside awaiting news of the former president's health after being admitted for what was called "routine tests".  Photo: APMessages written to former South African president Nelson Mandela by children from a nearby school are seen on a sign outside Milpark Hospital in Johannesburg. National and international media hovered outside awaiting news of the former president's health after being admitted for what was called "routine tests".  Photo: ReutersA child shows messages she and her class mates made for Nelson Mandela at a school near Milpark Hospital in Johannesburg. National and international media hovered outside awaiting news of the former president's health after being admitted for what was called "routine tests".  Photo: SapaA child is seen putting up message to wish Nelson Mandela well at her school  near Milpark Hospital in Johannesburg. National and international media hovered outside awaiting news of the former president's health after being admitted for what was called "routine tests".  Photo: SapaMessages for Nelson Mandela put up on fence of a school near Milpark Hospital in Johannesburg. National and international media hovered outside awaiting news of the former president's health after being admitted for what was called "routine tests".  Photo: SapaMessages to wish Nelson Mandela well, made and put up by children, are seen on a fence of a school near Milpark Hospital in Johannesburg. National and international media hovered outside awaiting news of the former president's health after being admitted for what was called "routine tests".  Photo: SapaPupils from a school adjacent to the hospital where former South African President Nelson Mandela is said to be undergoing routine tests, watch from under a get well message posted on a window.  National and international media hovered outside awaiting news of the former president's health after being admitted for what was called "routine tests".  Photo: APChildren show a message they made for Nelson Mandela through a window of a school near Milpark Hospital in Johannesburg. National and international media hovered outside awaiting news of the former president's health after being admitted for what was called "routine tests".  Photo: SapaA teacher puts up a flag and messages made for Nelson Mandela at a school near Milpark Hospital in Johannesburg. National and international media hovered outside awaiting news of the former president's health after being admitted for what was called "routine tests".  Photo: Sapa

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