Vatican faces flak over mobster's grave

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iol news pic 13 feb Vatican Conspiracies AP The Vatican criticised a popular American nun on Monday, saying her book on sexual ethics, including topics such as masturbation and homosexuality, contradicted Catholic teaching and must not be used by Catholic educators.

Rome: The Vatican is facing a deepening controversy over the burial 22 years ago of a notorious crime boss, with reports emerging that the church accepted a 1 billion lire (R5 million) payment from the mobster’s widow to allow his interment in a basilica.

A source at the Holy See said that “despite initial reluctance”, the then vicar-general of Rome, Cardinal Ugo Poletti, “in the face of such a conspicuous sum, gave his blessing” to the controversial interment of Enrico de Pedis, the former boss of Rome’s notorious Magliana gang.

The money was reportedly used on missions, and to restore the Basilica of St Apollinare, where the mobster was buried next to popes and cardinals after his death in 1990.

The claims, which the Vatican has not commented on, may explain how such a reviled criminal was laid to rest in such a hallowed site.

Last week, to deflect growing criticism and help resolve a 30-year-old murder mystery, it emerged that Vatican officials had decided to move the remains of De Pedis from his special crypt.

Pressure mounted earlier this month when a prosecuting magistrate, Giancarlo Capaldo, claimed senior officials at the Vatican knew much more than they were letting on about the Magliana gang’s links to the Holy See, and the gang’s suspected kidnapping and murder of Emanuela Orlandi, the 15-year-old daughter of a Vatican official, in 1983.

“There are people still alive, and still inside the Vatican, who know the truth,” he said.

“Some believe Emanuela’s father had evidence linking the Vatican Bank, Istituto per le Opere di Religione, to organised crime, and that she was snatched to keep him silent. The theory is that De Pedis, who was shot dead in 1990, organised the kidnapping.

For the past two decades, there has been speculation that Emanuela’s remains were put in the tomb alongside De Pedis.

The girl’s brother, Pietro Orlandi, has joined calls for the tomb to be opened.

The Vatican – under heavy scrutiny after a set of scandals – denies the claims and has hinted that investigators will be able to witness the reopening of the crypt, in an attempt to quash the rumours.

“There are no Vatican secrets to reveal,” said a spokesman for the Vatican, Father Federico Lombardin.

It is likely that the body of De Pedis will be moved to a less high-profile place of rest. Even if the girl’s remains are not found in the crypt, the mystery surrounding her disappearance will remain. – The Independent


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