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Toilet exhibit leaves visitors flushed

A toilet exhibition featuring a giant slide and singing toilet seats has opened at the Miraikan science museum in Tokyo.

It is entitled "Toilet !? Human Waste and Earth's Future".

A girl wearing a faeces-shaped hat prepares to slide down into a five-metre (16.4-ft) toilet at an exhibition titled "Toilet !? Human Waste and Earth's Future" at the Miraikan National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation in Tokyo July 3, 2014. The exhibition, which ...A man wearing a faeces-shaped hat prepares to slide down into a five-metre (16.4-ft) toilet at an exhibition titled "Toilet !? Human Waste and Earth's Future" at the Miraikan National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation in Tokyo July 3, 2014. The exhibition, which  ...A girl walks past a screen showing images of faeces flowing though the sewer system at an exhibition titled "Toilet !? Human Waste and Earth's Future" at the Miraikan National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation in Tokyo July 3, 2014. The exhibition, which opened a ...A woman walks past a choir of toilets that sing to thank visitors for putting in the effort of trying to learn more about what is normally a taboo topic of sitting on them, at an exhibition titled "Toilet !? Human Waste and Earth's Future" at the Miraikan National Museum ...

The exhibition explores the world of toilets, with the main exhibit centring around a massive toilet into which visitors are allowed to slide to simulate the journey of human waste matter into the sewers.

The exhibit also includes five zones that range from showing exactly what one's excrement is made of to how different types of toilets are used around the world, and even a possible space toilet that could be used to grow plants.

The exhibit is open until October 5.

Staff say the exhibit aims to make people more comfortable discussing their bowel movements.

'Toilets and faeces are normally thought of as very unclean topics, but I would like for people to actively talk about them instead of just thinking that they're dirty,' says museum staff member Tami Sakamaki. – Reuters

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