A motorist holds a fuel pump at a Gulf petrol station in London in this April 18, 2006 file photo. Oil dropped nearly 2 percent on March 20, 2012 as Saudi Arabia sought to knock back crude's price rise that has threatened the global economy, with the oil minister offering the most detailed argument to date that the OPEC nation was prepared to meet any supply shortfall. REUTERS/Luke MacGregor/Files (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS ENERGY COMMODITIES)
A motorist holds a fuel pump at a Gulf petrol station in London in this April 18, 2006 file photo. Oil dropped nearly 2 percent on March 20, 2012 as Saudi Arabia sought to knock back crude's price rise that has threatened the global economy, with the oil minister offering the most detailed argument to date that the OPEC nation was prepared to meet any supply shortfall. REUTERS/Luke MacGregor/Files (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS ENERGY COMMODITIES)

Petrol, diesel in short supply

By Kgopi Mabotja Time of article published Aug 10, 2015

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Johannesburg - The Fuel Retailers Association (FRA) has confirmed that there is a petrol shortage in Joburg and some parts of the country following a shutdown of a major Durban refinery for planned maintenance and further unforeseen disruptions at the SA Petroleum Refineries (Sapref).

On Sunday, FRA chief executive Reggie Sibiya said numerous fuel companies were affected by the shortage, but mainly BP stations were hard hit.

“Products affected are ULP 93, ULP 95 and Diesel 50. Both the Alrode and Langlaagte depots have run out of products more than once,” he said.

According to Sibiya, more than 100 service stations across the country are running dry of one or all of these products.

“I know of two BP service stations that have not received product since Thursday and are 100 percent dry on all products from yesterday. We are told that over and above the planned shutdown at Enref in Durban, disruptions occurred to production at the Sapref refinery,” said Sibiya.

South African Petroleum Industry Association director Avhapfani Tshifularo said the closure of the refinery was not a surprise and that numerous interventions had been put in place to manage the situation.

Tshifularo could not immediately say what interventions were in place. “We will have the full information by Tuesday. Because of the long weekend, many people are not available,” he said.

The Enref refinery is South Africa’s second largest, which produces automotive, industrial, aviation and marine fuels, bitumen, lubricants, and a range of chemicals and solvents.

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