FILE - This Oct. 21, 2015 file photo shows the logo of the Swiss bank Credit Suisse, in Zurich, Switzerland. (Walter Bieri/Keystone via AP, file)
FILE - This Oct. 21, 2015 file photo shows the logo of the Swiss bank Credit Suisse, in Zurich, Switzerland. (Walter Bieri/Keystone via AP, file)

Credit Suisse uncovers client fraud at wealth management unit

By Bloomberg Time of article published Aug 28, 2020

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By Archana Narayanan and Patrick Winters

JOHANNESBURG - Credit Suisse Group AG is dealing with the fallout of a fraud at its international wealth management business two years after it was criticized by a regulator in a similar case that rattled the bank and raised questions about controls.

The Swiss lender dismissed a Zurich-based banker who forged documentation on an over-the-counter contract for an African wealth management client, according to people familiar with the matter. The deception, uncovered earlier this year, led to a loss of about 10 million francs ($11 million) for the bank and additional clients were also affected, the people said, asking not to be identified as the matter is private.

The case echoes a much bigger fraud when Patrice Lescaudron, a former star private banker, was sentenced to prison after he forged documents to cover mounting client losses. Lescaudron’s activity went undetected by Credit Suisse and his clients for years until a massive wrong-way bet on a Californian drugmaker in 2015 exposed his behavior. Switzerland’s financial regulator later identified deficiencies in the bank’s anti-money laundering controls and shortcomings in its oversight.

“Credit Suisse confirms a case from the first quarter of 2020 in which a small number of clients were affected by unauthorized actions of a client adviser,” the bank said in a statement. “Credit Suisse took appropriate legal measures and informed the affected clients and relevant regulators.”

Local media reported that Lescaudron has since died by suicide.

The fraud and losses were booked in the unit led by Raj Sehgal, which serves the non-resident Indian community and sub-Saharan Africa. Clients are in the process of being compensated, according to one of the people.

Sehgal was named head of the Africa and non-resident Indian business with a direct reporting line to ex-divisional chief Iqbal Khan two years ago. He’s now chairman of that business after a shakeup that saw his region merged into the Middle East unit led by Bruno Daher. International wealth management which caters to Credit Suisse’s wealthy clients outside of Switzerland and Asia, reported provisions for credit losses of 74 million francs in the first six months.

Wealth management head Philipp Wehle has been reviewing the business as part of a wider revamp of the bank. The wealth business is reshaping how it lends against hard-to-sell assets as well as its exposure to the oil-and-gas industry and shipping, which have been hit hard by recent market dislocations, Bloomberg previously reported.

BLOOMBERG

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