Volkswagen was charged with 60 counts of breaching the Canadian laws by importing vehicles that did not conform to prescribed emission standards. Photo: Reuters
Volkswagen was charged with 60 counts of breaching the Canadian laws by importing vehicles that did not conform to prescribed emission standards. Photo: Reuters

Volkswagen charged with violating vehicle emission standards in Canada

By Sanjana Shivdas Time of article published Dec 9, 2019

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BENGALURU – German automaker Volkswagen on Monday was charged with importing nearly 128 000 vehicles into Canada contravening the country’s environmental legislation, a Canadian government agency said.

Volkswagen was charged with 60 counts of breaching the Canadian Environmental Protection Act by importing vehicles that did not conform to prescribed emission standards, Environment and Climate Change Canada said.

The charges included two counts of providing misleading information, and a court hearing is scheduled for December 13 in the Ontario Court of Justice.

The company did not immediately respond to a Reuters request for comment.In 2015, the agency launched an investigation into the importing of certain vehicle models allegedly equipped with a prohibited “defeat device”.

In this case, the device was software that reduces the effectiveness of the emission control system during normal vehicle use, according to the agency.

News in 2015 that Volkswagen had used such devices to cheat emissions tests has so far cost the company about €30 billion ($33 billion) in fines, vehicle refits and legal costs, and also triggered a global backlash against diesel vehicles.

Volkswagen's German plants need to boost efficiency to match overseas operations, production chief Andreas Tostmann was quoted as saying, targeting €2 billion (£1.6 billion) in savings by 2023.

Meanwhile, German carmakers, including Volkswagen's Audi brand, have announced thousands of job cuts in recent weeks to address an expected 5 percent drop in global vehicle sales this year, with declines likely to spill into 2020.

"The pace of improvement is better abroad. In Germany, despite all the successes we've achieved, we have to do better," Tostmann told trade journal Automobilwoche.

Reuters

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