Lifelike statues of Struggle heroes and heroines are on display at Canal Walk, depicting icons who helped lead SA’s 350-year struggle for freedom. Picture Courtney Africa/African News Agency(ANA)
Cape Town - Lifelike statues of Struggle heroes and heroines are on display at Canal Walk.

They depict icons who helped lead South Africa’s 350-year struggle for freedom and democracy. The 100 sculptures in bronze were launched on Thursday outside Century City.

Dali Tambo, artist and chief executive of the National Heritage Project Company, says the sculptures are “a beautiful way to connect with the people involved with the struggle and depict the country’s brightest, best and bravest individuals”.

Tambo felt a strong desire to pursue the Long March to Freedom exhibition and said: “One day I spoke to my father, Oliver Tambo, and told him his sculpture was nowhere in the country, and if no one was going to do it, then I would. I later received a voice in my head of my father telling me that a sculpture should not only be done of him, but of all of them.

“Many of those who lived a long time ago have been left out of history, because there was an overwhelming concentration on the last generation that walked on the long journey to freedom, such was Walter Sisulu, Nelson Mandela and Oliver Tambo. We easily forget that 350 years prior to them, the struggle had already began, which is why the previous icons also had to be recognised,” said Tambo.

A social activist who was part of the struggle against apartheid, Denis Goldberg, said: “It’s important for people to understand that history did not revolve round particular persons but rather thousands of people.”

Mayoral committee member for economic opportunities, James Vos, said: “This exhibition will celebrate the uniqueness of the nation and each icon will have knowledge to share with those who come to visit.”

Tickets to see the exhibition are available at Computicket.

Dali Tambo officially opens the exhibition. The Directors of the National Heritage Project Non-Profit Company will launch The Long March to Freedom exhibition at Century City, Cape Town. Picture: Courtney Africa/African News Agency
Dali Tambo officially opens the exhibition. The Directors of the National Heritage Project Non-Profit Company will launch The Long March to Freedom exhibition at Century City, Cape Town. Picture: Courtney Africa/African News Agency
Dennis Goldberg lifts his fist in the air as a salute to the statues of Nelson and Winnie Mandela. Picture: Courtney Africa/African News Agency(ANA)
Lifelike statues of Struggle heroes and heroines are on display at Canal Walk, depicting icons who helped lead SA’s 350-year struggle for freedom. Picture: Courtney Africa/African News Agency(ANA)
The Long March to Freedom is a monumental procession of 100 life-size bronze statues, the largest exhibition of its kind anywhere in the world, and opens to the public at Century City, Cape Town, on 15 November 2019. Picture: Courtney Africa/African News Agency(ANA)
The statue of Fidel Castro. Lifelike statues of Struggle heroes and heroines are on display at Canal Walk, depicting icons who helped lead SA’s 350-year struggle for freedom. Picture: Courtney Africa/African News Agency(ANA)
The statue of Chief Kgamanyane Pilane (1820-1871), Chief of the Bakgatla-Baga-Kgafela. Picture: Courtney Africa/African News Agency(ANA)
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