Premier Helen Zille has sparked controversy again after a tweet suggesting a boycott of taxes, with the ANC saying it bordered on treason. Picture: Phando Jikelo/African News Agency.
Cape Town - Premier Helen Zille has sparked controversy again after a tweet suggesting a boycott of taxes, with the ANC saying it bordered on treason.

On Wednesday she tweeted: “The ANC government has an Achilles heel. Honest taxpayers will not continue forking up billions to corruption. If this continues, I’m going to be the first to mobilise a tax strike to bring this government to its senses. Anyone who gives them another chance is an accomplice.”

ANC Western Cape elections head Ebrahim Rasool said: “We call on her to withdraw this irresponsible statement and rather unite in action to grow South Africa. We also call on business leaders and workers’ leaders to repudiate her statement.’’ He added the premier should be investigated.

“Not even an election is worth the devastating consequences of her statement. We call on her party leader, Mmusi Maimane, to come out and tell us where he stands. Does he support a tax boycott or not?” he asked.

In the past few days, Rasool said the DA had gone on a negative campaign drive in which it had tried to convince voters to keep the ANC and another political party out of the Western Cape.

It’s not the first time Zille has come under fire for her controversial tweets. In 2017, Zille tweeted: “For those claiming the legacy of colonialism was ONLY negative, think of our independent judiciary, transport infrastructure, piped water, etc.”

She added: “Would we have had a transition into specialised health care and medication without colonial influence? Just be honest please.”

Last June, the public protector found that the tweets were a violation of the ethics code.

DA Western Cape leader Bonginkosi Madikizela said: “There’s no need for Zille to be investigated or to have action taken against her because she is right. This government has looted taxpayers’ money.”

Zille hadn’t responded to calls for comment at the time of going to print.

Cape Argus