SADTU members protest outside the Moses Mabhida building in Pietermaritzburg. Picture: Supplied by SADTU
SADTU members protest outside the Moses Mabhida building in Pietermaritzburg. Picture: Supplied by SADTU

KZN teachers start seven-day go-slow in protest against impact of budget cuts

By Jehran Daniel Time of article published Aug 18, 2021

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DURBAN – The South African Democratic Teachers Union (Sadtu) will embark on a seven day go-slow in KwaZulu-Natal from today in protest against the negative impact of budget cuts, its provincial secretary said.

Nomarashiya Caluza said Sadtu had delivered a memorandum to KwaZulu-Natal Premier Sihle Zikalala yesterday.

“We will be working to rule from today until the 24th of this month. After that, if they do not respond we will then go back to the streets and consider going to the court,” Caluza said.

According to Sadtu spokesperson Nomusa Cembi, issues of contention include unfilled vacant teacher posts at schools and the failure to pay some staff.

“Some of the issues have got to do with the fact that there are many teacher posts that have not been filled and that is frustrating a lot of our members because they cannot teach effectively,” Cembi said, adding that teachers eligible for a rural incentive had not yet received payment …

“Posts of substitute teachers have not been filled as well. That has a huge impact on ensuring effective learning takes place in the province.”

Cembi said the issues had arisen after the KZN department of basic education announced budget cuts of more than R6 billion for the financial year.

Premier Zikalala and KZN head of education Kwazi Mshengu met Sadtu members outside the Moses Mabhida building in Pietermaritzburg to receive their memorandum.

“Their march is in support of our cry as the department of education with regards to the budget cuts that we have experienced this financial year,” said the department’s spokesperson Muzi Mahlambi.

“Their members are now feeling the pinch in terms of workload so their march is to say look, premier and your cabinet, can you speak to the treasury.”

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