Non-Profit Organisation, 1000 Women Trust has embarked on a campaign to provide teachers and parents with the skills to address bullying in South Africa.Picture Supplied
Non-Profit Organisation, 1000 Women Trust has embarked on a campaign to provide teachers and parents with the skills to address bullying in South Africa.Picture Supplied

Cape NPO to help schools and parents with anti-bullying skills training

By Zodidi Dano Time of article published Apr 15, 2021

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Non-profit organisation, 1 000 Women Trust, has embarked on a campaign to provide teachers and parents with the skills to address bullying in South Africa.

This is after the suicide of grade 10 Limpopo school girl, Lufuno Mavhunga, who had allegedly overdosed on pills after she was violently beaten by a fellow school pupil for allegedly not responding to the pupils’ insults on social media.

Lufuno’s death has brought the issue of bullying to the forefront with social media even creating the #JusticeForLufuno.

Founding member of the organisation, Tina Thiart, said they have already sent a team to start the campaign in Limpopo.

“We have compiled a toolkit which will provide the resources for teachers and parents to address bullying in all forms. It can be accessed on www.bullying.co.za.

“There are also a range of values that parents can share with their school-going children in order to train them to be non-violent and respectful to girls. It can be accessed on www.maketime.org.za,” Thiart said.

She said the organisation also provides regular anti-bullying training to teachers and parents, which has been very popular.

Since its inception, more than 3 000 parents and teachers have received training. So far, in 2021, a total of 997 teachers and parents completed the training course of 1 000 Women Trust. Teachers who want to access training, can WhatsApp Thiart on 073 207 9079.

“We have also trained trauma councillors that visit schools to share the necessary skills with teachers on how to address bullying. As we speak, we have sent several of our trauma councillors to four schools in Limpopo to share important skills with teachers on anti-bullying mechanisms,” Thiart said.

She encourages schools to create a culture of acceptance and communication.

“Such a culture empowers learners to find positive ways to resolve conflicts and has an administration, teachers, and other staff who can support learners in making constructive decisions and respond proactively when aggression of any kind exists on the school campus.

“Schools must establish an anti-bullying policy with input from all members of your school community to determine how your school will implement rules of conduct,” she concluded.

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