American country music star Dolly Parton performs on the Pyramid Stage at Worthy Farm in Somerset, during the Glastonbury Festival June 29, 2014. Picture: Reuters/Cathal McNaughton
American country music star Dolly Parton performs on the Pyramid Stage at Worthy Farm in Somerset, during the Glastonbury Festival June 29, 2014. Picture: Reuters/Cathal McNaughton

Dolly Parton doesn't want a statue of herself outside the Tennessee Capitol

By Bang Showbiz Time of article published Feb 19, 2021

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Dolly Parton is asking legislators to not move forward with plans to erect a statue of her outside of the Tennessee Capitol building, because she doesn’t think it’s “appropriate” to put her “on a pedestal”.

Tennessee State Representative John Mark Windle put forward a proposal last month that would see a monument in Dolly’s likeness placed in front of the Tennessee State Capitol building in Nashville, which is the seat of government for the US state of Tennessee, and is also the location of the governor’s office.

But now, Dolly herself has come forward to insist she isn’t interested in having her own statue, because she doesn’t think it’s “appropriate” to put her “on a pedestal”.

In a statement released on Thursday, the “9 to 5” hitmaker said: “I want to thank the Tennessee legislature for their consideration of a bill to erect a statue of me on the Capitol grounds.

“I am honoured and humbled by their intention but I have asked the leaders of the state legislature to remove the bill from any and all consideration.

“Given all that is going on in the world, I don’t think putting me on a pedestal is appropriate at this time.

“I hope, though, that somewhere down the road several years from now or perhaps after I’m gone if you still feel I deserve it, then I’m certain I will stand proud in our great State Capitol as a grateful Tennessean.

“In the meantime, I’ll continue to try and do good work to make this great state proud.”

Plans for Dolly’s statue were put forward last month, when John Mark Windle said he wanted to recognise the music legend “for all she has contributed” to Tennessee.

The sculpture would have been paid for by the “Dolly Parton fund” - which includes gifts, grants and other donations - if commissioned, and the public would also have had a say on the statue’s design.

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