Jason Momoa at the Aquaman World Premiere. Picture: Bang Showbiz
Jason Momoa had to have "two stunt doubles constantly working" on the set of 'Aquaman' because of the elaborate action sequences.

The 39-year-old American actor plays the aquatic superhero - also known as Arthur Curry - in the James Wan directed flick and speaking at the DC Comic blockbuster's world premiere in London on Monday night he revealed he needed the help of his doppelgangers due to the numerous extravagant action sequences.

He said: "I definitely do a lot of my stunts but there's so many stunts in this that we had to constantly be prepping so I had two stunt doubles constantly working." 

Jason - who played the character in 'Justice League' - is seen for the first time in Aquaman's famous gold and green superhero costume and he admitted it was a thrill to FaceTime call his young kids, daughter Lola, 11, and nine-year-old son Nakoa-Wolf, from the set so they could see their dad dressed up.


The Hollywood hunk - who raises his kids with his wife Lisa Bonet - said: "My experience was looking in James Wan's eyes and he was delighted and filled with joy and he was stoked and I called my kids on FaceTime and got to see their faces, it was beautiful."

Dolph Lundgren also stars in the DC Extended Universe film and plays King Nereus, the father of Amber Heard's alter ego Mera.

During the shoot, the 61-year-old Swedish actor saw similarities between his 'Aquaman' character and iconic He-Man, who he portrayed in the 1987 film 'Masters of the Universe', and that came from director Wan being a big fan of the 80s children's cartoon and Mattel action figure range.

Dolph said: "Well, I think James Wan was a fan of 'Masters of the Universe' when he was a little kid and my King Nereus looks a bit like He-Man. So I think there's a reason why I got cast for this role but it was a great role and a very good cast and I think it's a fun movie."

Opening up about the highlight of his 'Aquaman' scenes, Dolph added: "Well look it's called dry for wet which means you shoot everything on a blue screen and you hanging on these wires 40 feet in the air conducting scenes and action.

"For me, I really look up to people who do these superhero movies because it's really difficult. And the more you weigh the more the harness pulls on certain areas of the male anatomy and after four or five hours you're ready to come down."