Prince Harry, the Duke of Sussex and Meghan, the Duchess of Sussex take part in a public walkabout at the Sydney Opera House. Picture: Bang Showbiz
Prince Harry, the Duke of Sussex and Meghan, the Duchess of Sussex take part in a public walkabout at the Sydney Opera House. Picture: Bang Showbiz

Prince Harry and Meghan talking to community leaders about BLM movement

By Bang Showbiz Time of article published Jun 9, 2020

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Prince Harry and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, are "holding calls with community leaders" about how they can help the Black Lives Matter movement.

The couple - who currently live in Los Angeles - are believed to be speaking to charitable organisations surrounding the movement to find out how they can lend their platform to the cause, following the protests that have been taking place after the death of George Floyd.

An insider told People magazine: "They are holding calls with community leaders and organisations but are doing that privately as they continue to see how they can play a role. But they also want to learn and talk about it like the rest of us."

The news comes after Meghan, 38, recently spoke about the tragedy and subsequent anti-racism protests during a video message to the graduating class of her old Los Angeles school, Immaculate Heart High.

Referencing the deaths of people of colour at the hands of police, she said: "What is happening in our country and in our state and in our hometown of LA has been absolutely devastating.

"I wasn't sure what I could say to you. I wanted to say the right thing and I was really nervous that it would get picked apart.

"I realised the only wrong thing to say is to say nothing because George Floyd's life mattered and Breonna Taylor's life mattered and Philando Castile's life mattered and Tamir Rice's life mattered... and so did so many other people whose names we know and whose names we do not know..."

Meghan - who has 12-month-old son Archie with Harry - apologised to the students for having to grow up in a world where racism is still prevalent and reflected on some advice she was given as a teenager.

She said: "I was thinking about this moment when I was a sophomore, I was 15... it's the year we do volunteer work.

"And I remember one teachers, Ms Pollia, said to me, 'always remember to put other's needs above your own fears.'

"That has stuck with me throughout my entire life and I have thought about it more in the last week than ever before.

"So the first thing I want to say to you is that I'm sorry. I'm so sorry that you have to grow up in a world where this is still present."

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