Eczema affects their cheeks and the joints of their arms and legs. Picture: PxHere

Babies exposed to sunlight early in life are less likely to develop eczema.

Researchers in Australia found that babies allowed into the sun for just a few minutes a day for the first six months were at a lower risk of the skin complaint.

However, those who received daily supplements of the so-called "sunshine vitamin" - vitamin D - for the first six months did not enjoy the same benefits.

The study authors, from the Telethon Kids Institute, said this suggested sunshine had beneficial effects beyond simply triggering the production of vitamin D, but that more research was needed.

Eczema can show up as red, crusty patches on your baby's skin, often during their first few months. It’s common and very treatable. Many infants outgrow it, according to webMD. 

The bad news is that they can get the condition just about anywhere on their body. Most often, it affects their cheeks and the joints of their arms and legs.