Scrapbooking has come a long way. Picture: Pexels

I spent the whole of last weekend going through my four-year-old’s “stuff”, sorting out six months’ worth of art projects. 

The result was a stack of paintings, arts and crafts I just couldn’t bring myself to get rid of. Every parent can relate, but then we’re faced with the difficult task of deciding what stays and what goes. 

Lucky for us, mommy blogs and lifestyle-centric websites are great resources when it comes to quick fixes and creative hacks.

Digital photo book

Scrapbooking has come a long way. Now, thanks to apps like ArtKive, you can preserve and celebrate their artwork in the digital space. Just order a box via www.artkiveapp.com, fill it with your child’s artwork and return it. ArtKive professionally photographs the artwork and uploads it to your account. You can view and share pictures on any device. 

Also visit keepy.me and www.plumprint.com.

Thanks to apps like ArtKive, you can preserve and celebrate their artwork in the digital space.

Magnetic paint

Most hardware stores or paint shops stock magnetic paint. One of the wonders of the 21st century, magnetic primer is a base coat that allows you to turn almost any surface into a resourceful notice board or display area. It allows you to hang and display notes and photos. Dedicate a wall in your home to art projects, and change it up every few months. 

Visit: www.builders.co.za.

Most hardware stores or paint shops stock magnetic paint. Picture: Wikimedia Commons

Memory box

If you’re big on the Marie Kondo approach to organising your life, you’ll appreciate the tidiness of a school memory box. A large organising folder or A4 box works best. Get the kids to write their names and school year on the front. Make sure the box is large enough to contain those massive art projects. 

Visit kellyleighcreates.com/school-memory-box/.

No bear gets left behind

My personal favourite. Figurative expressionist printmaker and sculptor Geoffrey Ricardo may have come up with the most novel and expressive way of preserving childhood toys. The Australian artist uses imprinting on damaged soft toys. Just apply a light coat of paint to the front of the toy and press it against craft paper. Mount the imprint on a canvas and display in your child’s room.

Hang it

A personalised art clothesline in each child’s room is a fun way of proudly displaying art projects. Here’s what you’ll need:

  • Pack of wooden pegs
  • 6-8 wooden shapes to be used as end pieces.
  • Picture wire and picture hanging set.
  • Hot glue gun.

Instructions:

Attach the painted wooden shapes to the pegs with the hot glue. While they are drying, hang the picture wire clothesline. Once the chosen end pieces are dried, clip them over the hanger. The only thing left to do is to hang those pieces of art!

Source: enchantedyankee.wordpress.com/.