THE Ancient Romans believed that knocking over a glass of vino was an omen of impending disaster. | Pexels Polina Tankilevitch
THE Ancient Romans believed that knocking over a glass of vino was an omen of impending disaster. | Pexels Polina Tankilevitch

6 food superstitions from around the world: How many of these do you never tempt fate with?

By Lutho Pasiya Time of article published Jun 1, 2021

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Superstitions - we’ve all heard some far-fetched mythical story about why we shouldn’t walk under ladders or eat while standing.

Food has been the source of many folk stories and traditions throughout history, and even forms some of our cooking habits to this day.

They might seem a little silly, but here are six weird superstitions people actually believe about food.

Never cut noodles

Noodles, typically 25cm in length, symbolise long life, so cutting them suggests cutting life short.

Always serve at least two bowls of rice

A single bowl of rice is often put out as an offering for the dead, so at least two should be on every table among the living.

Never seat thirteen at the table

The number 13 is considered unlucky in many countries. This superstition, a norm throughout the Italian peninsula and far beyond, is mostly followed and feared.

It is linked to the story of the Last Supper, the final meal Jesus shared with his apostles before he was betrayed and condemned to death. It is in fact believed that 13 diners bring loads of bad luck.

Don’t spill the salt

Some sources associate the idea that spilling salt is bad luck with the image of an overturned salt cellar in front of Judas Iscariot in Leonardo Da Vinci’s masterpiece “The Last Supper.”

However, historians have traced the notion back to the Sumerians of southern Mesopotamia, though their reasoning isn’t known.

Don’t spill your wine

Maybe it’s just because it’s a shame to waste good wine, but the Ancient Romans believed that knocking over a glass of vino was an omen of impending disaster.

The idea has persisted in modern Italy, where spilled wine means bad luck - unless you immediately apply a few drops behind each ear, which keeps misfortune at bay.

The power of garlic

Garlic is a symbol of good luck and excellent protection against spells in many cultures.

According to ancient widespread beliefs around the Italian peninsula, eating a clove of garlic on an empty stomach brings good fortune.

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