Are there health downsides to vegan and vegetarian diets? Picture: Supplied
Are there health downsides to vegan and vegetarian diets? Picture: Supplied

Are there health downsides to vegan and vegetarian diets?

By Lutho Pasiya Time of article published Feb 7, 2020

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The vegan and vegetarian diet has grown over the years, as more and more people started opting for a healthier lifestyle and better eating habits.

As much as these have a good health reputation, recent reports reveal that vegan and vegetarian junk food may be even worse for people’s health. 

Experts do reveal that there are potential pitfalls to meatless eating, but nutrition, education and using supplements when needed, can help people overcome them.

We chatted with international health expert Maria Ascencao, and what she highlighted is that junk food, whether vegan or vegetarian is generally unhealthy.  

Are there health downsides to vegan and vegetarian diets? Picture: Supplied

“Not all vegan food is healthy as some contain very high amounts of salt, sugar, saturated fat and less protein to make it taste as rewarding as normal fast food which can lead to increased blood pressure, heart attacks or strokes,” said Ascencao.

Asked whether there are any health downsides to these diets, she said some vegetarians or vegans may be at risk of developing nutrient deficiencies such as vitamin B12 or vitamin D3 which may lead to negative side effects such as loss of bone and muscle mass. Therefore it’s vital to ensure your diet contains all the necessary vitamins and minerals required for good health and complementing with high-quality supplements such as BetterYou B12 Boost, DLux vitamin B and D oral sprays which are proven to work better than injections, tablets and Purest Omega 3, an omega 3 supplement with the purest ingredients. 

Are there health downsides to vegan and vegetarian diets? Picture: Supplied

Ascencao also mentioned that vegan and vegetarian diets may be restrictive and for beginners, if meals are not planned properly you may choose to eat unhealthy sugary or processed foods out of hunger. 

“Speak to a nutritionist and plan meals well in advance. The best thing you can do for your body is to exclude sugar and processed food. 

"Plant based-diets such as the flexitarian diet which encourages 70 – 80 percent natural, whole foods, including plenty of fruits, vegetables and plant-based protein sources including legumes and nuts, along with modest amounts of high-quality organic poultry, fish and red meat is more flexible than fully vegetarian or vegan diets and is more of a lifestyle than a diet,” she said. 

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